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  • Minister of Health, Dr. the Hon. Christopher Tufton, says over 50 vector control workers have been employed in Hanover, to assist in the destruction of mosquito-breeding sites in the parish.
  • Speaking at the Ministry of Health ‘Taking Responsibility Road Tour’, at the Walter Hall Anglican Parish Church in Lucea, Hanover, on February 21, Dr. Tufton said the workers have been providing mosquito-prevention information to residents.
  • “We have been able…to manage the dengue outbreak in these parts. This was never a parish that have significant number of cases. From January 2018 up to February 2019, we have seen 27 cases. Hanover has remain relatively calm,” he pointed out.

Minister of Health, Dr. the Hon. Christopher Tufton, says over 50 vector control workers have been employed in Hanover, to assist in the destruction of mosquito-breeding sites in the parish.

Speaking at the Ministry of Health ‘Taking Responsibility Road Tour’, at the Walter Hall Anglican Parish Church in Lucea, Hanover, on February 21, Dr. Tufton said the workers have been providing mosquito-prevention information to residents.

“We have been able…to manage the dengue outbreak in these parts. This was never a parish that have significant number of cases. From January 2018 up to February 2019, we have seen 27 cases. Hanover has remain relatively calm,” he pointed out.

Dr. Tufton explained that so far some 8000 premises have been inspected by the vector control workers. He noted that mosquito breeding sites were found at 12 per cent of the premises inspected.

“I’ve visited the workers and toured community spaces. I think the team is doing a good job and I want to commend them,” he stated.

Dr. Tufton also reiterated the need for proper management of solid waste.

“We are…going to have to be a little more effective in terms of managing solid waste and continuing the issue of personal responsibility. Even in the case of dengue, the challenge is not the Aedes aegypti mosquito so much, as it is how we manage solid waste, our water system and how we have to store water,” Dr. Tufton said.

Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne tropical disease caused by the dengue virus and is endemic in Jamaica. The virus is transmitted by the bite of an infected female Aedes Aegypti mosquito. Symptoms for dengue typically begin three to 14 days after infection. This may include a high fever, headache, vomiting, muscle and joint pains, and a skin rash. Symptoms usually last two to seven days.