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    • “These notes are used in legal proceedings, so persons who are trained as Court Reporters could work in several courts across the island. They could also work in the Office of the Services Commission, Houses of Parliament and in other public-sector areas, such as Industrial Disputes Tribunal. Even the Jamaica Defence Force uses writers for their different sessions as well as private-sector entities when they're having, for example, their annual general meetings. They would call on reporters to come and take verbatim notes,” she explains.                                                                                                              
    • “Our facilitators will work with individuals who are willing and want to complete the programme and to successfully make it to the end. Persons who are capable of working independently, while we will provide the training and instruction, much of learning a new skill calls upon an individual to do their own work. When you're not in the classroom setting, when you're at home, for example, turn on the news and write what is being said by the reporter; that is how you get your practice,” she points out.                              
    • “Our facilitators will work with individuals who are willing and want to complete the programme and to successfully make it to the end. Persons who are capable of working independently, while we will provide the training and instruction, much of learning a new skill calls upon an individual to do their own work. When you're not in the classroom setting, when you're at home, for example, turn on the news and write what is being said by the reporter; that is how you get your practice,” she points out.                              

    The Justice Training Institute (JTI) is inviting interested persons to submit applications for its Diploma Programme in Court Reporting.

    The renewed call comes after the JTI paused the programme’s delivery for the last three years to improve the offerings of the course.

    Director Principal at the JTI, Karen Campbell Bascoe, says Court Reporting is a skill that can be used in many sectors.

    “These notes are used in legal proceedings, so persons who are trained as Court Reporters could work in several courts across the island. They could also work in the Office of the Services Commission, Houses of Parliament and in other public-sector areas, such as Industrial Disputes Tribunal. Even the Jamaica Defence Force uses writers for their different sessions as well as private-sector entities when they’re having, for example, their annual general meetings. They would call on reporters to come and take verbatim notes,” she explains.

    Court Reporters use a machine, usually referred to as the steno writer, to capture the spoken word.

    “It allows them to capture it at a much faster rate than if they were using a laptop or a desktop computer. The steno writer is designed to capture up to or more than 200 words per minute if they’re able to write at that speed. So, we’re calling persons to enquire and we’ll provide additional information on how they can be trained to record and transcribe notes,” Mrs. Campbell Bascoe says.

    Interested persons should have at least five subjects at the Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) Level, one of which must be English Language, to enter the programme.

    “Outside of the academic requirements, we want persons who are highly self-motivated, because writing using the steno machine is a skill. It takes a level of motivation to get that skill. To be able to grasp the concepts fast, we’re looking for persons who are goal-oriented; you must know where you want to go. We also want persons who are capable of working under pressure, since it’s a new skill and a new learning curve,” Mrs. Campbell Bascoe tells JIS News.

    The JTI’s Principal Director adds that the programme can seem challenging at the start.

    “Our facilitators will work with individuals who are willing and want to complete the programme and to successfully make it to the end. Persons who are capable of working independently, while we will provide the training and instruction, much of learning a new skill calls upon an individual to do their own work. When you’re not in the classroom setting, when you’re at home, for example, turn on the news and write what is being said by the reporter; that is how you get your practice,” she points out.

    In addition to working independently outside of a classroom to build the skill, the JTI facilitates students being paired with existing court reporters, for them to have a better understanding of the application of the skill.

    “Our facilitators will work with individuals who are willing and want to complete the programme and to successfully make it to the end. Persons who are capable of working independently, while we will provide the training and instruction, much of learning a new skill calls upon an individual to do their own work. When you’re not in the classroom setting, when you’re at home, for example, turn on the news and write what is being said by the reporter; that is how you get your practice,” she points out.

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