JIS News

Minister of Health and Wellness, Dr. the Hon. Christopher Tufton, says the planned infrastructural upgrade of the Ginger Hill Health Centre, in St. Elizabeth, is further proof that the Government’s Adopt-A-Clinic programme has been working.

The clinic has been adopted by the hardware company, National Supply Ltd., with its owners making a three-year commitment  to provide $1 million each year to facilitate upgrades at the clinic.

Speaking at the adoption ceremony in Ginger Hill on August 14, Dr. Tufton said the Ministry is proud of the traction the Adopt-A-Clinic initiative has been gaining, both locally and throughout the Diaspora, adding that it has also been positively impacting lives in communities across the island.

 “I really want to commend the Chen See family (owners of the company) for really saying through this adoption, that they are grateful to the people and to the community of Ginger Hill,” he said.

“They [the family] have benefitted in their own development and evolved as a family and they want to give back to help others to benefit similarly. One of the messages that the local people should take from this experience is that good things and good people can come from Ginger Hill. You can’t be paid for that kind of sentiment or philosophy, it is something that you have to acquire and build within your culture…how you exist and interrelate with each other,” the Minister added.

Dr. Tufton said  the Adopt-A-Clinic initiative has garnered widespread support, with Jamaicans based locally and in the Diaspora committing $81.4 million to the cause.

He explained that adoption means giving  financial support based on the needs of the health centres, and visiting the facilities to interact with staff and the persons who utilise the centres.

For his part, Director of Sales and Marketing at National Supply, Donovan Chen See, said it was a very easy decision for his company to adopt the health centre, considering the connection his family has had with the Ginger Hill community, spanning almost 100 years.

“My grandfather occupied this spot for a number of years and my father was born close to here nearly 90 years ago. For us, it allows us the opportunity to re-engage,” he told JIS News.

Mr. Chen See said the centre will also alleviate some challenges for the community, giving residents access to health services they would most times have to travel all the way to Black River to get.

Launched in 2017, the Adopt-A-Clinic programme seeks to engage civil society, as well as members of the Diaspora, as contributors towards improving the delivery of primary healthcare.

Under the initiative, the Ministry has earmarked 100 of the 320 health centres across the island for support by local and international individuals, groups and corporate entities for three to five years.

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