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Story Highlights

  • The Victim Services Division (VSD) of the Ministry of Justice has received support tools from the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), to assist in enhancing psychological support services for children suffering from emotional trauma associated with by crime.
  • The items include dolls, building blocks, play doh, puzzles and children’s furniture.
  • They will serve as psychological support tools for children who are undergoing treatment at the parish offices.

The Victim Services Division (VSD) of the Ministry of Justice has received support tools from the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), to assist in enhancing psychological support services for children suffering from emotional trauma associated with by crime.

The items include dolls, building blocks, play doh, puzzles and children’s furniture. They will serve as psychological support tools for children who are undergoing treatment at the parish offices. The toys will be distributed to VSD offices islandwide.

At the handing over ceremony, held on January 25 at the offices of the Ministry, on Oxford Road, in Kingston, Director of the Division, Rev. Osbourne Bailey, said that the items are a critical part of the therapeutic exercises offered by the VSD to their young clients.

Rev. Bailey reported that for the January to December 2015 period, the division saw approximately 5,416 victims. Of this number, 3,269 were children and 60 per cent were females.

“The trauma experienced by children often, is not like a broken bone where you can see it and see if it is being healed. It is invisible and long term and cannot be easily mended. We believe that with the support being offered by the UNDP, what seem like toys are actually tolls that will be utilized to assist in the process of delivering a level of psychological support,” he explained.

Meanwhile, Permanent Secretary in the Ministry, Carol Palmer, thanked the UNDP for the items, which she said will go a far way in the treatment and recovery of children suffering from psychological disorders linked to crime.

“The Division serves our people who are in the worst of situations who are traumatized from time to time. The statistics show that the majority of its clients are in fact children. And so, it is very important when you have development partners who are willing to come on board with you to enhance what is available to serve these children,” Mrs. Palmer said.

For his part, Resident Representative,  UNDP, Bruno Pouzat, said the organisation is pleased to provide the assistance, and expressed confidence in the work of the VSD to provide effective support to victims of crime.

“These toys are tools in the very important process of helping victims of crime deal with the trauma of what they have experienced and return to a positive life,” he said.

The Victim Services Division provides psychological support and assistance to persons who have been victims of crime.