JIS News

Story Highlights

  • The Global Environment Fund (GEF) is designing programmes around the Scientific Research Council’s (SRC) case studies on bio-gas technology.
  • This is being done as part of the implementation of a regional bio-gas project, Manager of Process Development at the SRC, Julia Brown, explained at a JIS ‘Think Tank’, on January 26.
  • The SRC started their waste water services in the 1970s, which involved converting waste to energy (bio-gas technology), to help with the oil crisis, and to seek alternatives to fossil fuel, Miss Brown explained.

The Global Environment Fund (GEF) is designing programmes around the Scientific Research Council’s (SRC) case studies on bio-gas technology.

This is being done as part of the implementation of a regional bio-gas project, Manager of Process Development at the SRC, Julia Brown, explained at a JIS ‘Think Tank’, on January 26.

“The SRC, through the Government of Jamaica, has a major role to play. We are the most advanced, as it relates to bio-gas technology… and they are looking forward to our expertise in assisting in the implementation of the project,” she added.

The SRC started their waste water services in the 1970s, which involved converting waste to energy (bio-gas technology), to help with the oil crisis, and to seek alternatives to fossil fuel, Miss Brown explained.

Later in the early 1990s, the Council began focusing on the holistic approach to the management of waste, looking at the whole environmental thrust and acquiring benefits, while preserving the environment, she added.

Since then, the SRC has designed systems to deal with waste from the agricultural sector (farming communities), agro-processors, and industrial businesses, among others.

Miss Brown argued that with the amount of sewage and agro-industrial waste that is produced in Jamaica, waste to energy alone could provide over 75 per cent of our energy needs.

In the meantime, Executive Director of the SRC, Dr. Cliff Riley, informed that bio-gas technology is patented by the SRC, based on the structural design, and advised that if anyone in Jamaica is building a bio-digester septic tank system, they should contact the SRC, as it is illegal to utilize the design without having the entity involved.

He pointed out that the SRC is the only institution in the Caribbean region that is allowed, by law, to collate and distribute scientific information across the country.

Dr. Riley said that the SRC’s goal is to contribute to the growth of the country using science, technology and innovation.