JIS News

Story Highlights

  • Members of the Senate have expressed delight that the United States of America has officially lifted its designation of the Republic of Cuba as a state sponsor of terror, as the two countries seek to re-establish diplomatic ties.
  • Speaking at the sitting of the Senate on May 29, Leader of Government Business, Senator the Hon. A.J. Nicholson, said the move “is long overdue

Members of the Senate have expressed delight that the United States of America has officially lifted its designation of the Republic of Cuba as a state sponsor of terror, as the two countries seek to re-establish diplomatic ties.

Speaking at the sitting of the Senate on May 29, Leader of Government Business, Senator the Hon. A.J. Nicholson, said the move “is long overdue” and will help to strengthen the relationship between the two nations.

“Word has come to us that the spectre of a terrorist state has been removed from the Republic of Cuba and Mr. President. Indeed, this is long overdue. Things are happening and the tension within the Hemisphere is slowly being removed and receding,” he said.

For his part, President of the Senate, Floyd Morris, in offering his good wishes, said the Senate will convey in writing “to our friends, on behalf of both sides of the Senate, our congratulations to the Government and people of Cuba.”

In his remarks, Opposition Senator, Alexander Williams, said with this latest development, it is hoped that there will be greater cooperation between Cuba and the rest of the Caribbean, including Jamaica.

“It is heartening to see the thawing of relations between the current United States government and the Cuban people and this is another significant step along that route,” he said.

“The fallacy of Cuba being designated a terrorist state has come to an end. The Cuban people may not have followed a course of development that certainly other Caribbean territories have followed, in terms of their political arrangements, but they are still friends and we still, I feel, enjoy a close connection with the Cuban people,” Mr. Williams said.

The removal was announced by the State Department on May 29 in a Statement. It noted that while differences with the country remain, they were not a hindrance to Cuba’s removal from the list.

United States President, Barack Obama, had notified Congress earlier this year that he intended to remove Cuba from the list, giving lawmakers 45 days to object, which elapsed on May 29.

Cuba’s removal from the list means that it will have more access to global financial markets and loans from international organizations, such as the World Bank. The country was added to the terrorism list in 1982.