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  • The Commission for the Prevention of Corruption is urging public servants required to make statutory declarations of their assets, liabilities and income, to do so before the filing deadline on March 31.
  • Mr. Grey also noted that under the Act, there is a schedule of positions to which the $2 million threshold is not applicable.
  • Public servants who fail to file their assets, liabilities and income, in full, can be fined up to a maximum of $200,000 or be imprisoned for two years.

The Commission for the Prevention of Corruption is urging public servants required to make statutory declarations of their assets, liabilities and income, to do so before the filing deadline on March 31.

Since January 2003, public servants have been required to give statutory declarations on an annual basis, within three months of December 31 of each year, as is outlined in the Corruption (Prevention) Act, 2001.

Secretary/Manager for the Commission, David Grey, told a JIS ‘Think Tank’ today (March 16), that for the year ending December 31, 2015, the deadline for the filing of statutory declarations for public servants is March 31, 2016.

“Persons required to give statutory declarations should be earning $2 million and above as a result of them being in a position that affords that remuneration. This amount includes all benefits of the office, such as salary, travelling, uniform and other allowances which would accumulate to $2 million or more,” he explained.

Mr. Grey also noted that under the Act, there is a schedule of positions to which the $2 million threshold is not applicable.

“If you are in any of the named positions, whether you earn over $2 million or less, you are required to make a statutory declaration,” he stressed.

Some named positions are Parish Councillors, members of the Jamaica Constabulary Force and the Jamaica Defence Force, persons with Office Management responsibilities, Customs Officers, Island Traffic Authority  personnel as well as other positions in specific government Ministries, Departments and Agencies (MDAs).

Mr. Grey said the aim of the Act is to ensure that public servants are fair, honest and lack corruption in their dealings.

“The filing of statutory declarations is to indicate to the Commission that they are not undertaking any activity as a result of them being employed to the public service and is detrimental to the public service. So, this means they are not taking bribes, increasing their assets unwittingly or using their office for gain,” he explained.

Public servants who fail to file their assets, liabilities and income, in full, can be fined up to a maximum of $200,000 or be imprisoned for two years.

Public servants may contact the Commission at 968-6227 or visit their website: www.cpcpd.gov.jm, for further information about making statutory declarations.