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  • St. James Public Health Services is reporting a more than 60 per cent reduction in the parish’s aedes index since the start of vector control activities in January.
  • Speaking in an interview with JIS News, Parish Manager, Lennox Wallace, told JIS News that vector--control workers and aides have been working feverishly to eradicate mosquito breeding sites in the parish.
  • “When we started January 5, the inspections would have yielded a 27 per cent aedes index; that is the number of homes that you would have inspected to the number of breeding sites that we would have found. Right now we are at nine per cent, so we are making gains,” he informed.

St. James Public Health Services is reporting a more than 60 per cent reduction in the parish’s aedes index since the start of vector control activities in January.

Speaking in an interview with JIS News, Parish Manager, Lennox Wallace, told JIS News that vector–control workers and aides have been working feverishly to eradicate mosquito breeding sites in the parish.

“When we started January 5, the inspections would have yielded a 27 per cent aedes index; that is the number of homes that you would have inspected to the number of breeding sites that we would have found. Right now we are at nine per cent, so we are making gains,” he informed.

He said that since the start of December, there have been no reports of mosquito breeding sites at the parish’s two ports of entry.

Mr. Wallace noted that the St. James Municipal Corporation and the National Solid Waste Management Authority (NSWMA) are providing support in the removal of bulky waste, which provides breeding grounds for mosquitoes.

“We have… gone into communities two days per week and collected these bulky wastes to ensure that these breeding sites are removed,” he said.

In the meantime, Mr. Wallace is urging persons not to prevent vector-control workers from entering their premises to carry out inspections.

He said that the activities of the workers are crucial in the fight against dengue and other vector-borne diseases.

“I am urging the public to treat our vector-control workers with respect. Do not rush them out of your homes; do not stone them. Encourage them to come into your property to look for these breeding sites, because it is for your benefit and for your children’s benefit,” he said.

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