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  • The Kingston and St. Andrew Corporation (KSAC) is refuting reports that it has placed a ban on the feeding of homeless persons on the streets, as it is only seeking to regularize and coordinate the work of the groups that have caring programmes for these persons.
  • Mrs. Brown Burke said coming out of the meeting, several homeless persons were examined by professionals and placed at the Bellevue Hospital.
  • Some of the locations where the homeless are fed in the Corporate Area are the Open Arms Drop-In Centre, the Marie Aitkens Night Shelter, Mona Baptist Church, Bethel Baptist Church and the Salvation Army.

The Kingston and St. Andrew Corporation  (KSAC) is refuting reports that it has placed a ban on the feeding of homeless persons on the streets, as it is only seeking to regularize and coordinate the work of the groups that have caring programmes for these persons.

According to Mayor of Kingston, Senator Angela Brown Burke, the KSAC recently met with stakeholders following concerns from persons about the activities of the homeless, and while several recommendations were accepted, no ban was placed on persons being fed on the streets.

Mrs. Brown Burke said coming out of the meeting, several homeless persons were examined by professionals and placed at the Bellevue Hospital.

She informed that there was also an agreement to promote the use of all the feeding centres which are operated by churches and civic organizations, “where if you are feeding people, you can establish a schedule.”

The Mayor said that although the people who are feeding the homeless have good intentions, if the activity is not managed in can be part of the problem that the KSAC is trying to rectify.

“I start from the viewpoint that sometimes when you pass individuals, they have four or five food (boxes), and another day they might be hungry, or somebody else doesn’t have a meal for the day,” Senator Brown Burke noted.

The Mayor said concerns have come from persons who encounter problems while entering the Supreme Court, in downtown Kingston, while others going about their business have unpleasant encounters with the homeless.

She explained that going forward, a part of the solution is to discourage the congregating of the homeless in certain sections of the area, which the feeding programme encourages.

“Persons also complain about what is happening around St. William Grant Park, without making the connection that part of the problem has to do with our homeless population and what they do there. We believe that it is part of our responsibility to have a safe and thriving community,” the Mayor said.

Some of the locations where the homeless are fed in the Corporate Area are the Open Arms Drop-In Centre, the Marie Aitkens Night Shelter, Mona Baptist Church, Bethel Baptist Church and the Salvation Army.

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