JIS News

The Jamaica Defence Force (JDF) yesterday received digital video equipment and Rules of Engagement (RoE) Aide Memoires from the British High Commission, during a ceremony at Up Park Camp, in Kingston.

They were presented to Colonel Rocky Meade of the JDF by British Defence Attaché to Jamaica, Lieutenant Colonel Christopher Gunning.

AnAide Memoire is an abridged version of the Rules of Engagement policy document. It is small, handy and practical enough for soldiers to carry at all times and they are expected to be conversant with its requirements.

Speaking at the presentation ceremony, Colonel Meade thanked the British Government for their contribution, noting that the document “will ensure that our soldiers are aware of the rules by which they should engage with our citizens.”

The video equipment, he said, will assist with the continuous training of members of the Force, and pointed out that the RoE cards are now done in a much more durable format.

In his remarks, Lieutenant Colonel Gunning informed that the project, valued at some $500,000, seeks to maintain the highly professional and valued reputation of the JDF.

“The Rules of Engagement project also exemplifies the excellent relationship between the defence section of the British High Commission and the JDF,” he said, adding that the donations signal the completion of a successive collaborative two-year project.                                                                                

“By working together, we have developed the concept into a set of training aids, and legally binding procedures. The result, I believe, is also a better trained Jamaica Defence Force and consequently a safer patrolling environment not only (for) civilians but soldiers as well,” he added.

Throughout the project, the JDF received DVDs and training equipment. This included the installation of a state-of-the-art Firearm Training Simulator (FAT) at the Moneague Training Camp, in St. Ann.

The simulator provides soldiers with computer generated real life situations in which they are required to make rules of engagement decisions in a simulated environment.

 

CONTACT: CHRIS PATTERSON