Advertisement
JIS News

Ambassador to the United States, Her Excellency Audrey Marks has called on Jamaicans in the Diaspora to use their talents and resources to help in the development of the country.
“We cannot allow the challenges to our society to stea1 our will; rather we must seek out the opportunities afforded by global communities and show to the world that we believe in Jamaica,” she said.

Jamaica’s Ambassador to the United States, Her Excellency Audrey Marks (left), accepts a citation given by the Governor of Maryland, Martin O’Malley, recognising her as Jamaica’s first female Ambassador to the United States. The citation was presented Maryland’s House of Assembly Delegate, Shirley Natham-Pulliam (right), at Sunday’s (August 29) Service of Thanksgiving commemorating Jamaica’s 48th year of Independence, at the Baltimore Central New Testament Church of God, in Maryland.

The Ambassador was addressing a service to celebrate Jamaica’s 48th year of Independence, organised by the Jamaica Association of Maryland (JAM), at the Baltimore Central New Testament Church of God on August 29.
“To fulfill Jamaica’s promise that was envisioned at Independence in 1962, a promise of a Jamaica with safe and secure communities, a Jamaica that is the perfect place to live, a perfect place to visit, and a perfect place to transact business, the government has embarked on a new and different socio-political and micro-economic pathway,” she said.
She argued that Jamaica is determined to become the model for economic revitalisation in the hemisphere.
The Ambassador said the government, the private sector and civil society, are fully engaged in the bold initiative to dismantle garrisons and to ensure that there are laws which will strengthen the country’s capacity to respond to threats to its security and the safety of its citizens.
“As we pause at this time to reflect on the journey of our island home, let us not forget that the legacy we now enjoy is a legacy that was earned by the great sacrifice of our founding fathers,” she said.
The Jamaican envoy said as she undertakes her duties in the United States she will be seeking to enhance the excellent relationship that exists between Jamaica and the United States and to elevate Jamaica’s profile among its citizens, to ensure greater investments for the country and to enhance both the human and financial resources of the Diaspora.

Jamaican-born teacher, Delrose Clarke (right), accepts a citation given by the Mayor of Baltimore, Stephanie Rollins-Blake for her 30 years of service to the Baltimore Public School system. Presenting the citation on the Mayor’s behalf is Maurine Murray, at Sunday’s (August 29) Service of Thanksgiving commemorating Jamaica’s 48th year of Independence, at the Baltimore Central New Testament Church of God, in Maryland.

Prime Minister, the Hon. Bruce Golding’s Independence message was read by the President of JAM, Rick Nugent.
“We have come a long way over these 48 years and much has been accomplished, but the dream of independence has not yet been fulfilled as much more remains to be done,” the Prime Minister said.
“The spirit that inspired us to achieve independence, the belief that we are a people who can accomplish great things, must never be allowed to die, for it is the spirit that will propel us to make up the lost grounds and achieve the goals that our founding fathers laid out for us,” Mr. Holding added.
Ambassador Marks was recognised by the Governor of Maryland, Martin O’Malley with a citation honouring her as the first Jamaican female Ambassador to Washington.
Jamaican-born teacher, Delrose Clarke was honoured with a citation from the Mayor of Baltimore, Stephanie Rollins-Blake for her over 30 years of service to the Baltimore Public School system.

Skip to content