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  • Commissioner of Police, Major General Antony Anderson, says digital content is being developed to enable members of the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) to train remotely.
  • The Commissioner made the disclosure at the annual awards banquet of the Lay Magistrates Association of Jamaica (LMAJ), St. James Chapter, which was held at the S Hotel Conference and Event Centre in Montego Bay, on January 25.
  • “There are 186 police stations across the country, and we have just under 12,000 members in the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF), spread all over the island. It becomes very difficult to deliver training to that many people in any sort of centralised way,” Mr. Anderson said.

Commissioner of Police, Major General Antony Anderson, says digital content is being developed to enable members of the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) to train remotely.

The Commissioner made the disclosure at the annual awards banquet of the Lay Magistrates Association of Jamaica (LMAJ), St. James Chapter, which was held at the S Hotel Conference and Event Centre in Montego Bay, on January 25.

“There are 186 police stations across the country, and we have just under 12,000 members in the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF), spread all over the island. It becomes very difficult to deliver training to that many people in any sort of centralised way,” Mr. Anderson said.

“We are developing digital content so that they can, where they are, get the learning. We have just signed off on that, and it’s being developed as we speak. It is no longer just electronic copies of paper documents you have to go through, which no one is going to do, but we are actually developing online content with video, animation [and so on] to train our officers where they are,” the Commissioner said, adding that this move is to develop a culture of training in the JCF.

Additionally, Mr. Anderson noted that recruitment for new members of the Force has increased, with careful attention being paid to the deportment of the new crop of officers.

“We are going through the process of increasing the quantity of officers we have. It is critical, because most areas are actually short of police officers and we need more, but we need to make sure that the people we bring in are the right people, and that they receive the right training, particularly with respect to attitude, to be able to deliver the kind of policing that you (citizens) expect from us,” the Commissioner said.

He pointed out that training instructors undergo a rigorous selection and training process, not only learning the practical skills required to instruct but they end up with a postgraduate diploma in law-enforcement instruction, and they are also HEART Trust/NTA-qualified instructors.

“These are the gatekeepers who are going to ensure that we are delivering the police officers out there that will show you the respect, will have the skill and knowledge required to deliver the type of policing service that we have wanted for years,” the Commissioner emphasised.

The ceremony served to recognise outstanding JPs in the areas of health, tourism, religion, community service and sports. Among the awardees were Physician, Dr. Derek Harvey; Teacher, Lorna Forrester, and President of the Chapter, Egerton Forrester.

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