JIS News

Story Highlights

  • Jamaica’s High Commissioner to the United Kingdom (UK), Aloun Ndombet Assamba, was among the guests at a site dedication ceremony on Wednesday, July 9, for the long-awaited statue for pioneering Jamaican nurse Mary Seacole.
  • Chairman of the Mary Seacole Memorial Statue Appeal, Lord Clive Soley of Hammersmith, said the statue will be erected next year to mark the 160th anniversary of the Jamaican’s arrival in Crimea.
  • High Commissioner Ndombet-Assamba said that all Jamaicans are very proud of Mary Seacole and the statue was a great honour to her work.

Jamaica’s High Commissioner to the United Kingdom (UK), Aloun Ndombet Assamba, was among the guests at a site dedication ceremony on Wednesday, July 9, for the long-awaited statue for pioneering Jamaican nurse Mary Seacole, at the Gardens of St. Thomas’ Hospital in Westminster, London.

Chairman of the Mary Seacole Memorial Statue Appeal, Lord Clive Soley of Hammersmith, said the statue, which will be the first in London dedicated to a named black woman, will be erected next year to mark the 160th anniversary of the Jamaican’s arrival in Crimea.

“We are confident that this statue to a brave, enterprising and caring woman will honour her and recall her memory and that of the British troops, who she lovingly served,” Lord Solely said.

High Commissioner Ndombet Assamba said that all Jamaicans are very proud of Mary Seacole and the statue was a great honour to her work.

She also commended the Statue Appeal Committee and all of the supporters of the campaign for making the tribute to Mary Seacole possible.

The campaign to erect a statue to honour Mary Seacole started in 2010. The goal was to raise £500,000. Most of the money has been raised, however, Lord Solely said that a further £90,000 is needed to ensure that the statue will be unveiled in 2015.

Mary Seacole, who was born in Kingston in 1805, was well known as a ‘doctoress’ for her work in Jamaica and in Panama.

She set up the ‘British Hotel’ during the Crimean War from 1854 to 1856, where she fed and cared for wounded soldiers. She was posthumously awarded the Jamaican Order of Merit in 1991. In 2004 she was voted the greatest black Briton.