JIS News

The Manchester Health Department observed Caribbean Wellness Day at Mandeville Park, Friday (September 11).
Persons were encouraged, by various health professionals, to manage and prevent chronic non-communicable diseases. The event also featured live demonstrations of gym exercises, sack races, squat competition for males and females, dance competitions and other forms of physical exercises.
Medical Officer of Health (moh) for Manchester, Dr. Beverly Wright, noted that chronic non-communicable diseases, which place a significant burden on the population, are preventable.
“They last for a long time, and also take a longer time to develop, as oppose to infectious diseases. The infectious diseases develop in a short while and, if properly treated, in a short while most persons are over the infections. But, the chronic diseases take a long time for the development of the conditions, and some people die before they can be treated,” she explained.

Medical Officer of Health for Manchester, Dr. Beverly Wright, addressing the Caribbean Wellness Day function, Friday (September 11) at Mandeville Park. Caribbean Wellness Day is a collective effort by CARICOM to control and prevent chronic non-communicable diseases in the region.

The MOH added that, with the Government establishing free health care at public health facilities, there are no excuses for not having proper medication. Improved access to medication is available, but there is a need for individuals to play an active role in their health management, she said.
She added that information is available for persons to manage their health, and that the Health Department will be embarking on other public outreach projects to promote healthy living.
“We are calling on the individual to prevent non-communicable diseases by practising healthy lifestyles, by focussing on proper nutrition and increased physical activity,” she emphasised.
Caribbean Wellness Day is a collective effort by CARICOM to prevent and control heart disease, stroke, diabetes, hypertension, obesity and cancer in the region, by addressing casual risk factors including unhealthy diets, physical inactivity and tobacco and alcohol abuse.

Skip to content