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JIS News

Story Highlights

  • The Canadian High Commission is expressing pleasure with the operation of the Case Information Statistical System (CISS) in the nation’s courts.
  • CISS, a component of the Canadian Government-funded Justice Undertakings for Social Transformation (JUST) programme, captures data on court-related activities. It was implemented in the parish courts in October 2016.

The Canadian High Commission is expressing pleasure with the operation of the Case Information Statistical System (CISS) in the nation’s courts.

CISS, a component of the Canadian Government-funded Justice Undertakings for Social Transformation (JUST) programme, captures data on court-related activities. It was implemented in the parish courts in October 2016.

The system is intended to enable the relevant stakeholders to determine the true case load of each court and in the overall judicial system; monitor the efficiency with which cases move through the courts; and to better analyse and address the challenges of court management.

Speaking at a recent press conference at the Ministry of Justice’s Constant Spring Road offices, Counsellor and Head of Development Cooperation at the Canadian High Commission, Walter Bernyck, said CISS represents “one of the most progressive and potentially impactful investments”.

He said that the data generated is making a significant impact in the reduction of case backlog in the courts, and allows for a more efficient distribution of resources across the judicial system.

“This new way of doing business in the courts is reflected in the Court Statistical Reports that are produced using CISS data,” he pointed out.

The first report was tabled in Parliament by Justice Minister, Delroy Chuck, in April, and is available on the Supreme Court’s website.

Counsellor Bernyck said that the statistical reports “represent a new era of transparency and accountability”.

“These are national source documents that can be accessed on the Internet by the general population, academics, interest groups, and the media,” he pointed out.

Counsellor Bernyck noted further that information on the justice system and its operations helps clarify the judicial process for Jamaicans, thus making the justice system more answerable, accessible and clearer.

This JUST programme, which is being implemented at a cost of CAN$17.8 million, seeks to provide the necessary resources to reform Jamaica’s justice system, making it more available, accessible, accountable, flexible, fair and affordable in a timely, courteous, respectful and competent manner for all citizens.