• JIS News

    Story Highlights

    • ‘I Believe Initiative (IBI)’ Ambassador, Amanda Fraser, is encouraging young people to exercise caution when responding to job offers, particularly over the Internet, in order to avoid becoming victims of human trafficking.
    • Speaking in a recent interview with JIS News, she noted that “a lot of young persons are being recruited by people who are posting job offers for models and different things, and when they show up for these job interviews, they are trafficked”.
    • She said that jobseekers must first ascertain whether the companies or persons offering them work are reputable.

    ‘I Believe Initiative (IBI)’ Ambassador, Amanda Fraser, is encouraging young people to exercise caution when responding to job offers, particularly over the Internet, in order to avoid becoming victims of human trafficking.

    Speaking in a recent interview with JIS News, she noted that “a lot of young persons are being recruited by people who are posting job offers for models and different things, and when they show up for these job interviews, they are trafficked”.

    She said that jobseekers must first ascertain whether the companies or persons offering them work are reputable.

    “If you are communicating with somebody online, you should call the company to make sure that the person is employed there. Also ensure that the emails are professional. Sometimes, you can pick up discrepancies if you know what you are looking for. Also look for a professional business conduct,” Miss Fraser advised.

    The IBI Ambassador, who is a Clinical Psychologist and Founder of the Acts of Grace Foundation, also encourages parents to pay close attention to their children’s Internet use.

    She said parents must also be concerned about where their children hang out, and the people with whom they associate.

    “Never cease to warn your children about the pitfalls of being part of the wrong crowd,” she added.

    Miss Fraser told JIS News that the IBI ambassadors have been charged to go out into their various communities and sensitise young people about human trafficking.

    “We have ambassadors, who are aware of the message and are spreading it,” she noted.

    Human trafficking was the main topic at the IBI National Youth Consultative Conference, held recently in Montego Bay, with more than 1,500 students benefiting from the forum.

    The conference is an annual event that targets youth between 17 and 35 years. It provides a forum for constructive dialogue towards empowerment and development.

    The IBI is part of the Governor-General’s Programme for Excellence.

    The values-based programme, launched in 2011, serves to motivate and inspire youth to believe in themselves, achieve their God-given potential and give service to their country.