JIS News

Story Highlights

  • For the second time, Mishawn Chin-See’s brilliant artistic design depicting road safety procedures emerged victorious in the 2014 National Road Safety Council (NRSC) Poster Competition.
  • The Wolmer’s Trust High School for Girls student copped first place in the age 15 to 19 category for her piece, conveying ingenious messages on road safety.
  • Mishawn explained that in addition to researching the key words on the theme, “I tried to understand the theme as best as I could and I just try to display it in a visual way.”

For the second time, Mishawn Chin-See’s brilliant artistic design depicting road safety procedures emerged victorious in the 2014 National Road Safety Council (NRSC) Poster Competition.

The Wolmer’s Trust High School for Girls student copped first place in the age 15 to 19 category for her piece, conveying ingenious messages on road safety.

Last year, Mishawn also edged out the other competitors to win in the 10 to 14 category.

In a recent interview with JIS News following the awards ceremony, at the Knutsford Court Hotel in New Kingston, the soft-spoken student said she was somewhat doubtful when her entry was submitted.

Explaining she says she had recently turned 15 years old and thought that many of the older students’ pieces would have been much better than hers.

“I feel happy and overwhelmed. I didn’t expect that I would have won but I hoped that I would have (been) placed because I am one of the younger persons in the category,” she said.

Outlining the method used in completing her entry, Mishawn explained that in addition to researching the key words on the theme, “I tried to understand the theme as best as I could and I just try to display it in a visual way.”

Providing road safety tips, she urged users of the road, especially pedestrians to be vigilant. “Don’t be on your phone or any devices…especially when you are crossing the road, even if you are on the sidewalks, accidents do happen…Look where you’re going and make sure when you are crossing the road, the driver has stopped (before attempting to cross),” she tells JIS News.

The winners and runners-up were chosen from 53 hopefuls, who competed in the categories of age six to nine; 10 to 14; and 15 to 19, under the theme: ‘Pedestrian Safety – Our Responsibility’.
Twenty-eight students were recognised for their artistic work on road safety during this year’s competition. Nineteen entries were awarded certificates of merit, and two received honourable mention.

Winner in the 10 to 14 category, Michael Gunn of Corinaldi Avenue Primary told JIS News that it took him three days to complete his poster.

The 12 year old thanked his teacher for the support and encouragement leading up to the deadline and confessed that after seeing some of the posters at the venue, he had doubts as to whether his would be victorious.

He explained however that after his name was announced he felt “very surprised and proud”.

Young Taeija Lee Hall Watts of Stella Maris Preparatory who copped the first place prize in the age six to nine category, said her poster highlights a traffic warden assisting children to cross the road safely.

She added that in the piece, the children explain the different rules regarding road safety, with various illustrations on each rule.

Meanwhile, second place went to Rachelle Armstrong of Sts. Peter and Paul Preparatory in the age six to nine category; Yashwah Ranger of Old Harbour High, in the age 10 to 14  category; and Micah Goldsmith of Ardenne High in the age15 to 19 group.

Kay Lee Williams of Mona Primary; David Salmon of Wolmers Trust High School for Boys; and Sabrina Brown of Merl Grove High placed third in the six to nine, 10 to 14, and 15 to 19 age groups, respectively.

The three winners each received cash prizes of $30,000; with $25,000 for second place; and $10,000 for third place. There were also trophies for the winners, scholarships at the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts; prizes for the schools, among others.

Providing the judges’ report, Executive Director, NRSC, Paula Fletcher said there were noticeable improvements in the quality and standards of entries in this year’s competition.

“We commend the efforts of the participants as well as their teachers and of course parents,” she added.

She explained further that the quality of the artwork generally showed innovativeness and understanding of the theme. There was also interesting use of materials.

However she noted, “There were obvious heavy outlines and heavy pigmentation particularly noted in the entries for categories one and two which suggested a significant adult influence in the work”. When this is apparent, the entry is disqualified.

She said majority of the entries addressed the theme of pedestrian safety, pointing out that 30 per cent of persons, who die on the nation’s roads, are pedestrian, with a third of them being children.

She added that the NRSC continues to focus on pedestrian safety as it is estimated that every three minutes a child dies on the world’s roads.

Entries were judged based on their adherence to the theme; creativity; road safety awareness; and presentation and style.

Minister of State in the Office of the Prime Minister, with responsibility for Primary Health Care Infrastructure, Hon. Luther Buchanan who addressed the awards ceremony urged pedestrians to be extremely cautious on the roads as the NRSC has indicated that many accidents are as a result of the unsafe use of roadways by pedestrians.

“I believe as drivers we have a duty of care to look out for pedestrians especially children by observing proper road etiquette and as pedestrians we have a similar duty to use the roads responsibly by practising safety measures,” he said.

He commended the students for their outstanding entries and lauded the organisers of the competition for its implementation.

The NRSC poster competition was introduced three years ago as an innovative and exciting part of the Council’s national efforts to increase the safety of youngsters on the roads, and solicit their perspectives on the traffic environment with which they interface on a daily basis.

Data from the National Road Safety Council (NRSC) indicate that since the start of the year more than 140 persons have died on the nation’s roads. This is 16 more than the corresponding period last year, and 31 more than in 2012.