JIS News

Story Highlights

  • Just over 290 tablet computers have been distributed to students of the Windsor School for Special Education, under the government’s pilot Tablets In Schools Programme.
  • There are four campuses of the school and the entire population of intellectually and physically challenged students in Duncans Pen, Spanish Town; Seven-west, Greater Portmore; Commodore, Linstead; and Denbigh, Clarendon received tablets.
  • Executive Director, Jamaican Association on Intellectual Disabilities, Christine Rodriguez, urged parents and guardians to play an even greater role in the learning and caring process.

Just over 290 tablet computers have been distributed to students of the Windsor School for Special Education, under the government’s pilot Tablets In Schools Programme.

There are four campuses of the school and the entire population of intellectually and physically challenged students in Duncans Pen, Spanish Town; Seven-west, Greater Portmore; Commodore, Linstead; and Denbigh, Clarendon received tablets.

Addressing the handing over ceremony at the Greater Portmore campus, on November 5, Executive Director, Jamaican Association on Intellectual Disabilities, Christine Rodriguez, urged parents and guardians to play an even greater role in the learning and caring process.

Mrs. Rodriguez said the devices will provide the children with a window to the world and that it is important for parents to appreciate the value of responsibility accompanying the technology’s introduction to the child’s learning process.

“The value of responsibility is one of the most important elements of good character.  A tablet is a very valuable piece of technology and eLearning believes in us enough that they will be giving every child a tablet.  It is now your mission to teach your child to become a responsible person, to care for the tablet and use it well,” she said.

“We have to nurture the children, affirm them, and care for them.  It is the way we handle our children which will help them grow in that sense of responsibility. I am calling on stakeholders to begin talking at Parent-Teachers Association and staff meetings to help our children to become responsible, successful students, and (eventually) successful adults,” the Executive Director added.

Also addressing the gathering was South St. Catherine Member of Parliament, Fitz Jackson, who challenged the school community to ensure that the Tablets in School programme becomes a success.

He pointed out that each and every child has the ability to learn and, therefore, should be afforded the opportunity to do so.

“In that regard, the role of the parent becomes critical. The general education programme of the country requires that the parents be an integral part of the learning process.  Windsor parents now have the opportunity to demonstrate how the tablets must be kept and used for the betterment of Jamaica,” he said.

The parents and teachers were elated that the school was chosen as a recipient.   One parent, Nicole Satchel, said she is pleased that her child is in the pilot phase of the programme.

“I’m happy for it and appreciate that they considered Windsor School of Special Education, because the kids need it here. It will enhance their learning activities. I’m really grateful,” Mrs. Satchel said.

Kimela Johnstone, told JIS News that it is a vote of confidence in the ability of the teachers and special education students, for them to be in the pilot programme.

“It’s awesome what eLearning and the Government have done for these children, and I know that the children will benefit tremendously from it. Think about the endless possibilities that the tablets offer. The teacher can now more effectively manage the classroom, helps with control and enhances the learning experiences,” she said.

The Windsor School for Special Education is one of 38 recipient schools and institutions to benefit under the $1.4 billion Tablets In Schools Pilot programme.  Some 25,000 students are to benefit, including special needs children.