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JIS News

Story Highlights

  • Minister of State in the Ministry, Hon. Ian Hayles, met with a group of large and small hoteliers, attraction providers, and operators of food establishments.
  • Mr. Hayles said the loading bays, utilised last year, will again be used in ensuring that properties have adequate water supply.
  • The Lucea pipeline project, now underway, is expected to significantly reduce the water problems on that side of the island.

The Ministry of Water, Land, Environment and Climate Change is working with tourism stakeholders in Negril, to minimise the effects of drought conditions on the industry.

Minister of State in the Ministry, Hon. Ian Hayles, met with a group of large and small hoteliers, attraction providers, and operators of food establishments in the resort town on January 25, for discussion on mitigation measures.

While not providing details on the measures agreed to, Mr. Hayles said the loading bays, utilised last year, will again be used in ensuring that properties have adequate water supply. The loading bay is where water is pumped for trucking.

“We brought some loading bays into the Negril and Sheffield areas allowing us to increase our efficiency. Instead of doing 10 loads of water per day, we were able to bring in between 45 and 55 loads per day in dealing with the problem,” Mr. Hayles said, noting that “this is an approach we will take going forward”.

The State Minister, in the meantime, said the Lucea pipeline project, now underway, is expected to significantly reduce the water problems on that side of the island.

He informed that the $1.2 billion project is scheduled to be completed in another six months.

“This will address the problems of Negril and the tourism sector once and for all by ensuring that they have adequate water for the guests and for the people of Hanover and Westmoreland,” he told JIS News.