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JIS News

Story Highlights

  • By the end of August, the National Task Force Against Trafficking in Persons (NATFATIP) will have updated research findings on the situation of human trafficking in Jamaica.
  • The latest research was conducted in 2007.
  • Chairperson for NATFATIP, Carol Palmer, told JIS News said the findings will strengthen their efforts to combat the crime.

By the end of August, the National Task Force Against Trafficking in Persons (NATFATIP) will have updated research findings on the situation of human trafficking in Jamaica. The latest research was conducted in 2007.

Chairperson for NATFATIP, Carol Palmer, told JIS News said the findings will strengthen their efforts to combat the crime.

“The research underway is pointing us to some additional trafficking hotspots; however, when the research is complete the information in that regard will be handed over to the police and the other information will be used to guide our efforts,” she said.

Mrs. Palmer also noted that several persons are still in denial that this crime exists in Jamaica and tend to excuse some of the activities that are attributable to the crime as a part of the Jamaican culture.

“Human trafficking is a form of modern day slavery which is very rampant in the world today. It is a global phenomenon. After drug dealing, Trafficking in Persons (TIP) is tied with illegal arms as the second largest organized criminal industry in the world,” she informed.

The NATFATIP Chairperson identified the profile of trafficking victims in Jamaica as being predominantly females (79.3%), between 18 and 24 years of age, with secondary education (89.7%) and are from the working class or poor background (86.2%).

The research findings will provide a more detailed outline of the current profile of traffickers and their victims.

There are currently four cases before the Circuit Court, and other matters are in the lower court, with two cases slated for trial in October.

Jamaica is one of 134 countries and territories worldwide that have criminalized trafficking by means of a specific offence, in line with the Trafficking in Persons Protocol.