JIS News

Story Highlights

  • The Urban Development Corporation (UDC) is developing a $624 million sewage conveyance system for the Caymanas Estate property in St. Catherine.
  • The system comprises 7.4 kilometres of force main and two lift stations to convey sewage to the Soapberry Wastewater Treatment Plant.
  • YP Seaton & Associates has been contracted to undertake the eight-month project, work on which is expected to begin within the next four weeks.

The Urban Development Corporation (UDC) is developing a $624 million sewage conveyance system for the Caymanas Estate property in St. Catherine.

The system comprises 7.4 kilometres of force main and two lift stations to convey sewage to the Soapberry Wastewater Treatment Plant.

YP Seaton & Associates has been contracted to undertake the eight-month project, work on which is expected to begin within the next four weeks.

At the contract signing ceremony held on April 28 at the UDC’s headquarters, downtown Kingston, the Corporation’s Chairman, Senator K.D. Knight, said the project is to facilitate further development of Caymans Estate.

“The mandate of the UDC is to make development happen. One of the properties owned by the UDC where development needs to happen is at the Caymanas Estate,” he said.

Senator Knight informed that funding for the project came from the recent sale of assets including the Oceana Hotel, Forum Hotel and the Jamaica International Telecommunications (Jamintel) building.

Caymanas Estate, which is situated nine miles from the centre of Kingston and six miles east of Spanish Town, covers an area of 10,703 acres. It extends south of Mandela Highway and 1,800 metres north of the Sligoville main road.

The sewage system is designed to accommodate sewage from all developments planned for the area. However, individual development blocks will be responsible for constructing their own sewage conveyance link to the primary facility.

The UDC will provide engineering works and supervision for the project. The contract with YP Seaton includes a four-month period to correct any project defects.