JIS News

Story Highlights

  • Students and teachers at the Wait-a-Bit All Age School in Trelawny will soon benefit from improved facilities, as a result of an $11 million donation from the Japanese Government.
  • The donation will be used to build a computer room, repair a multi-purpose court, and fence the school.
  • The improvement work is to get underway shortly, and should be completed before the end of the year.

Students and teachers at the Wait-a-Bit All Age School in Trelawny will soon benefit from improved facilities, as a result of an $11 million donation from the Japanese Government.

The donation, which was provided by the Embassy of Japan, through its Grant Assistance for Grassroots and Human Security Project (GGP), will be used to build a computer room, repair a multi-purpose court, and fence the school.

The improvement work is to get underway shortly, and should be completed before the end of the year. In addition, the Wait-a-Bit Benevolent Society will contribute 37 computers and four printers.

Speaking at the grant contract signing ceremony at the Embassy of Japan, in Kingston on March 26 Minister of Education, Hon. Rev. Ronald Thwaites commended the Japanese Government for its willingness to provide aid, and the leadership of the school for its foresight in seeking assistance to enhance the premises.

Rev. Thwaites informed that although the Ministry spends billions annually, collaborations and partnerships such as these are crucial in ensuring that schools are properly equipped.

The Education Minister urged the community and the school to ensure that the work is undertaken within budget and on time.

“Too much of our national debt comprises overruns…and too much distress … takes place when commitments are made and they are not kept, especially in the area of introducing facilities,” he said.

Rev. Thwaites pledged the Ministry’s willingness to provide additional equipment once the room is built.

In his remarks Chargé d’Affaires, Koji Tomita said the project is in line with his country’s development policy of focusing on human security, which emphasises the protection and empowerment of people.

“It is thus our sincere hope that this school renovation project will greatly enhance the learning environment to empower the youth in the community and Jamaica at large,” he said.

In expressing gratitude for the assistance, Principal, Ted Jones informed that the discussions started seven months ago.

Mr. Jones also noted that the facilities, such as the computer room, and the multipurpose court, will be extended to members of the community as well.

Earlier this week, Mr. Tomita signed grant agreements with the Westmoreland Parish Council, for the provision of two ambulances and two fire trucks, valued at $8 million (US$81,010), under the GGP.

Since 1995, Jamaica has received $525 million (US$5 million) in funding assistance from the GGP. The assistance has been used to undertake 80 projects across the island.

The GGP provides support for small projects undertaken by local government authorities, non-governmental organisations, educational organisations, and medical institutions.