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  • President of the Jamaica Animation Nation Network (JANN), Kevin Jackson, says training and capacity building are integral to the growth and development of the animation sector. He noted that JANN, through partnership with Jamaica Promotions Corporation (JAMPRO) and the Youth Employment in Digital and Animated Industries (YEDAI) programme, has facilitated workshops and various training sessions to boost the creative sector. “It is very important for us to be involved in training, so we have provided consultations for the University of Technology (UTech) and the Vocational Training Development Institute (VTDI) in their curriculum [development]. We work closely with YEDAI, as they have been assisting with the development of training [initiatives] in the universities, high schools and helping to equip them with the relevant software and hardware that are required for animation,” Mr. Jackson said in a JIS interview. He added that the sector is increasing its capacity with persons graduating from tertiary institutions with certification in animation. “We had a few persons graduating from the University of the West Indies and still have graduates waiting to come out of UTech, VTDI, Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts, and Excelsior Community College. So capacity is building as we are expecting to have about 200 animators in the next two to three years, which is very necessary because about 200 persons are required for a big project such as a series,” he noted. Mr. Jackson informed further that YEDAI has been facilitating a ‘train the trainer’ programme with animators from Canada, United States of America, Costa Rica and Korea. (more) Animation Training…2 “The training has been very valuable because before the ‘train the trainer’, a lot of the persons doing animation were either information technology (IT) or art teachers, who were thrown into the role… so this initiative has not only equipped them with knowledge but has provided them with the confidence that they need to teach the skill as well as to push the industry forward,” he said. Another ‘train the trainer’ session is scheduled for June, targeting both tertiary and high-school teachers, particularly those who prepare students to sit animation in the Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Examination (CAPE). Mr. Jackson, in highlighting the sector’s role in economic development, said that animation is a valuable tool that generates employment for several persons, including actors, illustrators, story boarders, editors, sound engineers and fashion designers. “Animation assists in heightening awareness about issues relating to violence against children and child labour laws, and is a very powerful medium to entertain and educate,” he added.
  • He noted that JANN, through partnership with Jamaica Promotions Corporation (JAMPRO) and the Youth Employment in Digital and Animated Industries (YEDAI) programme, has facilitated workshops and various training sessions to boost the creative sector.
  • “It is very important for us to be involved in training, so we have provided consultations for the University of Technology (UTech) and the Vocational Training Development Institute (VTDI) in their curriculum [development]. We work closely with YEDAI, as they have been assisting with the development of training [initiatives] in the universities, high schools and helping to equip them with the relevant software and hardware that are required for animation,” Mr. Jackson said in a JIS interview.

President of the Jamaica Animation Nation Network (JANN), Kevin Jackson, says training and capacity building are integral to the growth and development of the animation sector.

He noted that JANN, through partnership with Jamaica Promotions Corporation (JAMPRO) and the Youth Employment in Digital and Animated Industries (YEDAI) programme, has facilitated workshops and various training sessions to boost the creative sector.

“It is very important for us to be involved in training, so we have provided consultations for the University of Technology (UTech) and the Vocational Training Development Institute (VTDI) in their curriculum [development]. We work closely with YEDAI, as they have been assisting with the development of training [initiatives] in the universities, high schools and helping to equip them with the relevant software and hardware that are required for animation,” Mr. Jackson said in a JIS interview.

He added that the sector is increasing its capacity with persons graduating from tertiary institutions with certification in animation.

“We had a few persons graduating from the University of the West Indies and still have graduates waiting to come out of UTech, VTDI, Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts, and Excelsior Community College.

So capacity is building as we are expecting to have about 200 animators in the next two to three years, which is very necessary because about 200 persons are required for a big project such as a series,” he noted.

Mr. Jackson informed further that YEDAI has been facilitating a ‘train the trainer’ programme with animators from Canada, United States of America, Costa Rica and Korea.

“The training has been very valuable because before the ‘train the trainer’, a lot of the persons doing animation were either information technology (IT) or art teachers, who were thrown into the role… so this initiative has not only equipped them with knowledge but has provided them with the confidence that they need to teach the skill as well as to push the industry forward,” he said.

Another ‘train the trainer’ session is scheduled for June, targeting both tertiary and high-school teachers, particularly those who prepare students to sit animation in the Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Examination (CAPE).

Mr. Jackson, in highlighting the sector’s role in economic development, said that animation is a valuable tool that generates employment for several persons, including actors, illustrators, story boarders, editors, sound engineers and fashion designers.

“Animation assists in heightening awareness about issues relating to violence against children and child labour laws, and is a very powerful medium to entertain and educate,” he added.