JIS News

Story Highlights

  • According to Mrs. Wesley Wyndham, over the 14-week period from September, which is the first phase of this training programme, the participants are exposed to training focusing on administration, childcare practices, and the physical plant.                           
  • According to Mrs. Wesley Wyndham, an evaluation at the end of each workshop is in an effort just to see in terms of how training can be enhanced.   
  • The CPFSA, which falls under the purview of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information, works collaboratively with the Office of the Children’s Advocate (OCA), Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF), and other government agencies.                            

In keeping with the Child Protection and Family Services Agency (CPFSA) mandate to provide adequate care and protection for children in State care, more than 100 managers and senior members of staff assigned to residential childcare facilities will participate in virtual sensitisation training sessions up to December 2021.

This was disclosed by Monitoring Officer in the Southern Region of the CPFSA, Julia Wesley Wyndham, during a recent interview with JIS News.

According to Mrs. Wesley Wyndham, over the 14-week period from September, which is the first phase of this training programme, the participants are exposed to training focusing on administration, childcare practices, and the physical plant.

“The CPFSA knows how important are established and re-established partnership with the residential childcare facilities. We have recognised that over the years, different managers are employed, the children themselves are different in terms of their behaviour, so our focus on ongoing training is to ensure that the staff are familiarised with the standard of care,” she said.

The CPFSA’s role is to monitor and supervise these homes to ensure that they are operated in accordance with the agency standard, and that policies and protocols that govern the operation of the residential childcare facilities are always adhered to.

Mrs. Wesley Wyndham pointed out that during these training sessions, the participants will be exposed to practical ideas such as alternatives to corporal punishment, how to minimise the possibility of physical plant damage happening, and techniques on how to manage the different behaviour patterns.

“In terms of administration, sometimes we think that everybody can supervise a child; that’s not the case. Supervision of a child encompasses a whole bunch of different things. And it always depends on the age group,” she said.

“What you would do for a five-year-old, which is to monitor when they are watching the television, you cannot do it for the 12 years and older, because they want to go online, they want to go on social media and may fall victim to cyberbullying. And if that is the case, we must help managers and staff to understand how to supervise a child that is online, while still ensuring that they still have some amount of privacy and autonomy,” she said.

Another feature of the sessions is pre and post survey which will be used as an evaluation tool.

According to Mrs. Wesley Wyndham, an evaluation at the end of each workshop is in an effort just to see in terms of how training can be enhanced.

“In terms of the expected outcome from the workshop, it is hoped that the knowledge and information that the participants would have gained will definitely enhance how they perform their duties,” she said.

The CPFSA, which falls under the purview of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information, works collaboratively with the Office of the Children’s Advocate (OCA), Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF), and other government agencies.

It was formed out of a merger of the Child Development Agency and the Office of the Children’s Registry.

The agency is charged with providing support for children in need of care and protection, including those who have been abused, abandoned neglected or are vulnerable due to disability.

 

 

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