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Story Highlights

  • Three judges have been appointed to serve at higher offices within Jamaica’s judiciary.
  • Governor-General, His Excellency the Most Hon. Sir Patrick Allen, presented the judges with their instruments of appointment during a swearing-in ceremony held at King's House on Friday (September 15).
  • Chief Justice, Zaila McCalla, charged the newly appointed judges to continue to maintain the high standards of professionalism that is required of them, to be astute in their deliberations and decision-making and ensure that judgements are delivered in a timely manner.

Three judges have been appointed to serve at higher offices within Jamaica’s judiciary.

They are Ceciel Pettigrew Collins and Calys Ruth Patricia Wiltshire, who will act as Puisne Judges of the Supreme Court, and Andrea Maud Thomas, who will act as Master-in-Chambers of the

Supreme Court. The appointments take effect from September 18.

Governor-General, His Excellency the Most Hon. Sir Patrick Allen, presented the judges with their instruments of appointment during a swearing-in ceremony held at King’s House on Friday (September 15).

In offering congratulations, he urged them to continue to protect the legitimacy and integrity of the judicial system.

“There is so much at stake in the judiciary, as one of the bastions of confidence by our people, and so I want to encourage our judges to continue relentlessly in your pursuit of excellence and the discharging of your responsibility fearlessly, sincerely, honestly and with integrity,” he said.

Chief Justice, Zaila McCalla, charged the newly appointed judges to continue to maintain the high standards of professionalism that is required of them, to be astute in their deliberations and decision-making and ensure that judgements are delivered in a timely manner.

“Ensure that you adhere to the practice directions that have been issued in order to improve the justice system. It is very important that you are vigilante in ensuring that the time of the court is not wasted and that cases are managed efficiently, especially with the vast number of cases that are being committed from our parish courts,” she noted.

Responding on behalf of her colleagues, Mrs. Pettigrew Collins expressed gratitude and appreciation on being appointed to higher office, and committed to continue to serve the country well.

She said continuous judicial education is paramount, particularly since new crimes have arisen with the advent of technology.

“In recent years, technology has brought out radical changes in the nature of crimes and the sophisticated methods utilised in committing them. We, in the judiciary, must inform ourselves of the latest developments and learn how to combat these crimes,” she pointed out.

“We consider ourselves fortunate to have come on board at this time when new and far-reaching pieces of legislation such as the DNA Act, the Evidence (Special Measures) Act, the Plea Negotiations Act… are in use,” she said, noting that these will simplify the process of adjudication.