JIS News

Story Highlights

  • The Rollington Town Primary School, in Kingston, has seen a big rise in numeracy, moving from 36 per cent in 2012, to 66 per cent in 2013.
  • The school also saw its literacy level rising in the same period from 78 per cent to 80 per cent.
  • The teaching/learning process, aided by computer technology, has paid off well for the students in numeracy and literacy.

The Rollington Town Primary School, in Kingston, has seen a big rise in numeracy, moving from 36 per cent in 2012, to 66 per cent in 2013, an achievement that the institution’s leadership attributes to the use of technology.

The school also saw its literacy level rising in the same period from 78 per cent to 80 per cent.

Minister of Education, Hon. Rev. Ronald Thwaites, who visited the institution recently, lauded the Board, the Principal and staff.

He encouraged the students to “keep straight, and do your studies,” and called on the parents to “start saving from now, because you are going to have to send them (students) to university.”

“When you are in primary school, you learn to be a well behaved and ordered person. You are here to build your character, to behave yourself, and to grow into good young people, and proper adults. Make sure to learn to read and write, and to speak the English language,” he told the children.

Speaking with JIS News, Principal, Dr. Margaret Bailey, explained that the teaching/learning process, aided by computer technology, has paid off well for the students in numeracy and literacy. “With the help of the computers, and exposure to new strategies, we are above the national average,” the Principal said.

On the same day the Minister visited the school, 57 computers were donated by the Canadian-based The Global and Mail. The group has been providing support to the school since 2001, an initiative of Gleaner Chairman, Oliver Clarke. The Jamaica National Building Society Foundation (JN) coordinated the handing over.

“We say thanks for this blessing of a very supportive partner in the business of educating our children and helping them to earn their places in society.  With the handing over of 21 laptops and 36 computers I can truly say that our goal of having a computer available for every classroom is being achieved,” Dr. Bailey told the handing over ceremony.

For his part, Canadian High Commissioner to Jamaica, His Excellency, Robert Ready, said the gifts came from persons with good hearts, who want to build education.

“It is a credit to those in Canada, who have the good hearts to organize this initiative; it is to the credit of Mr. Oliver Clarke, who fostered that relationship, and to the Principal of your school, who has also developed and encouraged that relationship, that these and other computer products and books can be made available here,” he said.

The new computers brought delight to the student body. Head Boy, Ziggy Adams, said the “children are going to be using them for better education, so we can go to better schools, and live better lives.”

Head Girl, Shanice Murray, said they provide “great opportunity, so we can learn better, and we should take care of them.”

The Principal told JIS News that under a sponsorship from Member of Parliament for East Kingston and Port Royal, Hon. Phillip Paulwell, a computer teacher is paid to provide training to the school community.

“We have extended the programme to include our parents, and the wider community, where we bring the parents in two evenings per week, and train them in the use of computers. Some have moved on to get jobs in this area, and some have gone on to HEART/NTA, to get further training,” she said.

The Principal informed that the computers are used by teachers to deliver the curriculum, and to prepare students for all the major exams. They are also used by the students to do projects.

The ceremony was also addressed by Mayor of Kingston, Senator Angela Brown Burke; Opposition Spokesperson on Youth, Culture and Gender Affairs, Olivia ‘Babsy’ Grange, as well as representatives from the JN group, and the school community.