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  • Teachers, who have been trained under the Ministry of Education’s Positive Behaviour Intervention System, are being urged to drive change in beliefs, attitudes, and behaviours, among students.
  • Portfolio Minister, Hon. Rev. Ronald Thwaites, issued the charge, as he addressed the closing ceremony for participants in the programme, held on April 17, at the Jamaica Theological Seminary in Kingston.
  • Teachers from approximately 22 schools participated in the training, in preparation for the roll out of re-socialisation programmes in primary and secondary schools in September.

Teachers, who have been trained under the Ministry of Education’s Positive Behaviour Intervention System, are being urged to drive change in beliefs, attitudes, and behaviours, among students.

Portfolio Minister, Hon. Rev. Ronald Thwaites, issued the charge, as he addressed the closing ceremony for participants in the programme, held on April 17, at the Jamaica Theological Seminary in Kingston.

Teachers from approximately 22 schools participated in the training, in preparation for the roll out of re-socialisation programmes in primary and secondary schools in September.

“This year, we are putting in resources and we are putting consummate emphasis on the issue of re-socialisation of our young people. There are a suite of programmes and remedies that we are bringing to the situation and your training exercise is a part of that,” the Education Minister noted.

He told the teachers, that their participation in the training course, will enable them to better assist students, who are in need of support to improve their behaviours.

“This is the opportunity to do something, and I am hoping that the exposure to…the various remedies and strategies…over this training period, will in fact, make a difference,” he said.

He said the re-socialisation programmes are crucial as data indicates that at least 20 per cent of children in schools are experiencing some level of challenge, weather material or psychological.

He argued that as one of the key agents for moulding and shaping the values and ideals of the youth, the education system has a key role to play in addressing the challenges.

He informed that in addition to providing opportunities for diagnosis and for therapy, “we have to have intense programmes that are school-wide so that everyone who is in school, becomes sensitive and a full participant…and (also) we have to have the measures that those who are severely affected can be offered particular treatment.”

The Minister said the intervention provided by the teachers, coupled with proper training at their homes, will enable students to become more positive and productive.

The training was undertaken by the Ministry in collaboration with the Jamaica Theological Seminary.

The Positive Behaviour Intervention System is aimed at addressing behavioural problems and helping students to develop positive social skills.

Teachers, who benefited from the training, are from high schools across the island. These include: Aabuthnott Gallimore, Brown’s Town and Ocho Rios in St. Ann; Charlie Smith and Trench Town, Kingston; Innswood and Taitus Golding, St. Catherine; Kemps Hill and Vere Technical, Clarendon; Knockalva, Hanover; Port Antonio, Portland.