Students Urged To Take a Stand Against Violence

Story Highlights

  • Students are being urged to take a stand against violence inflicted on women and girls and all types of child abuse, by Vice President, Development and Community Service, University of Technology (UTech), Professor Rosalea Hamilton.
  • Speaking at UTech Students’ Union launch of the 50th Annual Tag Drive, on November 9, on the campus, in Kingston, the Professor implored the students to play an active role in reducing the level of crime meted out to persons who are often the most vulnerable in society.
  • The theme for this year’s Tag Drive is: ‘End the Silence, Stop the Violence Against Women and Child Abuse’, and is central to the institution’s Fi Wi Jamaica project, which began in May and is a continuation of the UTech Cares programme.

Students are being urged to take a stand against violence inflicted on women and girls and all types of child abuse, by Vice President, Development and Community Service, University of Technology (UTech), Professor Rosalea Hamilton.

Speaking at UTech Students’ Union launch of the 50th Annual Tag Drive, on November 9, on the campus, in Kingston, the Professor implored the students to play an active role in reducing the level of crime meted out to persons who are often the most vulnerable in society.

“I want you to recognise that you have to stand up and fight. Don’t sit quietly and pretend as if you don’t hear the screams that (are) sometimes next door to you. Don’t pretend that you don’t see a strange vehicle or person in your midst,” she urged.

The theme  for this year’s Tag Drive is:  ‘End the Silence, Stop the Violence Against Women and Child Abuse’, and is central to the institution’s Fi Wi Jamaica project, which began in May and is a continuation of the UTech Cares programme.

Defining that project, Professor Hamilton noted that the goal is to empower socially excluded and vulnerable groups.

“The project specifically focuses on women and girls through a range of interventions – social, economic and cultural – to strengthen the demand for change in the society and to ensure that we advocate and really understand the importance of respect and dignity and freedom from discrimination and violence,” she explained.

She pointed out that four of the seven goals of the project are directly linked to the Tag Drive’s theme. Among the outcomes are proactive responses to trafficking in persons as well as domestic and intimate partner violence, which she noted are very serious problems across the world.

She informed that it is estimated that there are between 20 and 35 million persons  enslaved today, and that about 50 per cent of those persons are women, while about  80 per cent are below 24 years old.

On the issue of domestic and intimate partner violence, she noted that Fi Wi Jamaica is seeking to build partnerships to promote girls and women empowerment and encourage public demand for change.

The violence, the Professor said, jeopardises  a woman’s life,  body, psychological integrity and freedom, and called on the students to speak up and tell what they know about the commission of such crimes, despite the fear of reprisal by the perpetrators.

“I understand your concern … but as the problem gets worse, we are all at risk and it is not clear to me that you are more at risk if you speak than if you remain silent. And, so I urge you to take this seriously and to pay attention. It’s time to stop the silence and end the violence,” she emphasised.

Funds from this year’s Tag Drive will benefit the Jamaica Association for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities, Children First Agency, the Dominican Relief Fund, and the Blessed Assurance Mustard Seed Home.

 

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