JIS News

Story Highlights

  • Students from the over 200 high schools across the country are being encouraged to submit applications for nominees to run in the upcoming National Executive elections, for the National Secondary Student's Council (NSSC).
  • Jody Grizzle, Programme Development Specialist at the National Centre for Youth Development (NCYD), said that the elections slated to take place at St. George's College on April 29, should see contenders from across the island, vying for the positions of President, four Divisional Vice Presidents, Secretary, Treasurer and Public Relations Officer.
  • Layne Robinson, also a Programme Development Specialist at the NCYD, said that serving on the National Executive would prove to be a tremendous opportunity for these students.

Students from the over 200 high schools across the country are being encouraged to submit applications for nominees to run in the upcoming National Executive elections, for the National Secondary Student’s Council (NSSC).

Jody Grizzle, Programme Development Specialist at the National Centre for Youth Development (NCYD), said that the elections slated to take place at St. George’s College on April 29, should see contenders from across the island, vying for the positions of President, four Divisional Vice Presidents, Secretary, Treasurer and Public Relations Officer.

Mrs. Grizzle advised that students should look around for those “who have that dynamism and leadership potential and get them to apply. I think it’s a tremendous opportunity,” as “it is still the only youth organization that was legislated by an Act of Parliament.”

Layne Robinson, also a Programme Development Specialist at the NCYD, said that serving on the National Executive would prove to be a tremendous opportunity for these students. “It is an enormous training area for students who later on want to enter into the field of politics… representing the rights of other persons…or a career in law… it is a wonderful chance to start thinking in that way,” he stated.

First ever president of the National Secondary Student’s Council, now an attorney-at-law, and Minister of State in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade, Senator Delano Franklyn, concurred.

Reflecting on his tenure on the National Executive from 1978 to 1981, he said, “it threw you in the middle of the cut and thrust of debate.of ideas. It exposed you to practical involvement.”

The Minister said this early representational role also helped to develop his leadership skills. He noted that it allowed him to begin the process of putting forward proposals to overcome issues of concern, and exposed him at an early age, to bargaining and negotiation.

He added, “if you were to travel through Jamaica now – at the community level, in non-governmental organizations, in the state, in educational institutions – you will find a number of persons, who became first exposed to leadership, to teamwork, to debate, to representation in high schools, all because of the benefit of student councils and the NSSC.”