JIS News

Story Highlights

  • Minister of Labour and Social Security, Hon. Derrick Kellier is urging students to take the issue of productivity improvement seriously.
  • He was speaking at the closing ceremony of the Jamaica Productivity Centre’s (JPC) inaugural Secondary Schools’ Productivity Improvement Project.
  • He said the productivity revolution must begin with people, as no single entity or organisation can create and sustain the productivity movement.

Minister of Labour and Social Security, Hon. Derrick Kellier is urging students to take the issue of productivity improvement seriously as this will assist them with transitioning from school to work.

“In the future, it is qualitative productivity improvement that will determine whether you as members of the succeeding generation lead or follow; rise to the top; sink to the bottom; or stay in the middle. How productive you are, will ultimately determine Jamaica’s level of productivity and your place within it,” he said.

He was speaking at the closing ceremony of the Jamaica Productivity Centre’s (JPC) inaugural Secondary Schools’ Productivity Improvement Project, at the Jamaica Pegasus Hotel in Kingston on Wednesday, May 7.

“If you are presently an ‘A’ student, it is possible for you to become an ‘A plus’ student. In other words, even if you were to score 100 per cent in all your courses, you can still be a much better student by becoming involved in the non-academic life of your school,” he said.

Mr. Kellier said students are being targeted, as part of the national productivity revolution campaign to include all Jamaicans, which will ultimately redound to the benefit of the country.

“We want to inculcate in our students a productivity mindset. We also want to provide students with information about productivity and get them to think practically of ways in which they can apply productivity tools and techniques in everyday life,” he said.

He said the productivity revolution must begin with people, as no single entity or organisation can create and sustain the productivity movement.

“To make Jamaica more productivity driven and competitive, the value-added of each worker must increase. This, in turn, will require the need to rally the population, effect a change in its mindset and culture on the road to building a cohesive competitive team. This also is why the productivity revolution will only succeed if as Jamaicans we are all involved in the process,” he said.

Highlighting the importance of the Schools’ Productivity Improvement Project, he said it will expose the minds of Jamaican youth to practical approaches to productivity improvement.

He called on the students and teachers who participated in the exercise to join the Ministry and the Jamaica Productivity Centre (JPC) in the ongoing productivity revolution, by becoming productivity ambassadors.

Eight schools across Jamaica participated in the project. Immaculate Conception High School in Kingston emerged winners of the inaugural competition. Their project focused on conservation of tissue, water, and electricity in their school.

Jose Marti Technical High in St. Catherine copped second place, while Godfrey Stewart High in Westmoreland placed third.

The project aimed to expose students to the concept of continuous improvement, in an effort to raise their level of understanding of productivity. The programme taught students and teachers about the concept of continuous improvement and apply it to their school environment over 11 weeks.

Other participating schools included: Knox College; Mona High; Porus High; Seaforth High and Vauxhall High.