JIS News

Justice Minister, Senator the Hon. Mark Golding, has announced that legislation aimed at strengthening the Government’s Restorative Justice Programme is expected to be piloted through the Houses of Parliament during the 2013/14 financial year.

Speaking at the Ministry’s restorative justice workshop, hosted at the Grand Palladium Resort and Spa in Lucea, Hanover, on Saturday, February 16, Senator Golding said legislative strengthening is intended to better position the initiative as a tangible intervention to resolve differences between disputing parties, instead of resorting to confrontations.

In this regard, Senator Golding said the Ministry, which has portfolio responsibility for the initiative, and its agencies plan to collaborate with several stakeholders in an effort to expand the programme islandwide.

“The idea is that we are trying to start (by) establishing pilots in various parts of Jamaica, which (will include the training of persons) and facilitate the introduction of restorative justice practices in the communities where the pilots are (being undertaken),” he explained, while informing that seven restorative justice centres have, to date, been established islandwide, since the pilot phase started.

[RELATED: Senator Golding Confident Jamaicans will Embrace Restorative Justice]

The Minister added that: “if those pilots are successful, the idea is that the programme will be broadened and deepened to become a national programme.

Senator Golding expressed the hope that this approach will reduce the number of matters brought before the courts, which can be settled at the community level and thereby “have the additional benefit of reducing the burden on the court system”.

Justice Minister, Senator the Hon. Mark Golding, has announced that legislation aimed at strengthening the Government’s Restorative Justice Programme is expected to be piloted through the Houses of Parliament during the 2013/14 financial year.

Speaking at the Ministry’s restorative justice workshop, hosted at the Grand Palladium Resort and Spa in Lucea, Hanover, on Saturday, February 16, Senator Golding said legislative strengthening is intended to better position the initiative as a tangible intervention to resolve differences between disputing parties, instead of resorting to confrontations.

In this regard, Senator Golding said the Ministry, which has portfolio responsibility for the initiative, and its agencies plan to collaborate with several stakeholders in an effort to expand the programme islandwide.

“The idea is that we are trying to start (by) establishing pilots in various parts of Jamaica, which (will include the training of persons) and facilitate the introduction of restorative justice practices in the communities where the pilots are (being undertaken),” he explained, while informing that seven restorative justice centres have, to date, been established islandwide, since the pilot phase started.

[RELATED: Senator Golding Confident Jamaicans will Embrace Restorative Justice]

The Minister added that: “if those pilots are successful, the idea is that the programme will be broadened and deepened to become a national programme.

Senator Golding expressed the hope that this approach will reduce the number of matters brought before the courts, which can be settled at the community level and thereby “have the additional benefit of reducing the burden on the court system”.