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JIS News

Story Highlights

  • The SRC recently staged a sauce preparation workshop for cookshop operators in August Town.
  • The SRC will be targeting several other communities for training.
  • SRC provides training in food processing, extraction techniques, tissue culture, and other agro-processing areas.

Community cookshop operators are benefiting from training being provided by the Scientific Research Council (SRC), to help them meet quality standards and improve food preparation methods.

Executive Director of the SRC, Dr. Cliff Riley, told JIS News that the training involves collaboration with agencies such as the Jamaica Social Investment Fund (JSIF) and Members of Parliament.

“We look at some of the needs in each area, and through the Members of Parliament (MPs) and other social organisations such as JSIF, we identify persons, who are engaged in a particular type of business, who need a higher level of training so that they can meet the industry standards,” he said.

He noted that the aim is to build the capacity of these community entrepreneurs so that they can “better utilise the information and skills that they have.”

The SRC recently staged a sauce preparation workshop for cookshop operators in August Town.

The agency also hosted a free session at its Old Hope Road offices, where persons were trained in sauce creation and how to standardise their products.

They were also sensitised about the various health requirements in preparing sauces as well as their food.

“We want them to adopt and use good scientific principles, as well as meet the local and international standards for quality,” Dr. Riley told JIS News.

In addition to enabling these community entrepreneurs to enhance their operations, a key objective of the training is to expose them to other business opportunities.

“Instead of just preparing sauces for your own meals, you can look at it as a business, because it’s (sauce making) a vibrant business,” Dr. Riley said, noting that persons can utilise the skills learnt to create jerk sauces, jerk seasonings, among others.

He noted that “with the SRC being the type of organisation that it is, that is able to facilitate the manufacturing of these products, it’s a nice entry point for these persons. This fosters the spirit of entrepreneurship, and persons can see the various avenues for business.”

The SRC will be targeting several other communities for training.

In the meantime, the SRC Executive Director said the agency is looking at providing training in good agricultural practices for farming communities.

Dr. Riley told JIS News that the SRC training initiatives are aimed at ensuring that Jamaica has viable scientists and innovators.

He said persons may apply to attend these sessions, once they are advertised. Additionally, anyone may approach the SRC for training at anytime, whether as a group or as an individual.

SRC provides training in food processing, extraction techniques, tissue culture, and other agro-processing areas.