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  • “Pregnancy is a celebration life…but we also recognise that it is a significant time of stress. It is a time when relationships are strained and it is a significant point where we could intervene by having within our antenatal clinics, programmes targetting pregnant women to help them, to inform them, to encourage them to bring their partners in when they recognise that the pregnancy is not as celebrated as it should be,” she said.
  • “Twenty per cent of women were beaten during pregnancy. The beating involved kicking or punching in the abdomen,” Dr. Longmore informed.
  •  “Too many intimate, interpersonal, family and community relationships suffer with grave consequences on the basis of sometimes very simple misunderstandings. We need to be more tender and caring to each other in how were communicate, in how we look out for each other,” she said.

Government Senator, Dr. Saphire Longmore, is suggesting that intervention programmes be introduced at antenatal clinics to support pregnant women who are experiencing physical abuse at the hands of their partners.

“Pregnancy is a celebration life…but we also recognise that it is a significant time of stress. It is a time when relationships are strained and it is a significant point where we could intervene by having within our antenatal clinics, programmes targetting pregnant women to help them, to inform them, to encourage them to bring their partners in when they recognise that the pregnancy is not as celebrated as it should be,” she said.

Dr. Longmore was making her contribution to the State of the Nation Debate in the Senate on Friday (November 9).

She noted that such interventions are needed, given the prevalence of abuse among pregnant women. She cited the country’s first ever Women’s Health Survey which revealed that pregnant were significantly more likely to experience physical abuse by their male partner (27.4 per cent) than women who had never been pregnant (11.3 per cent).

“Twenty per cent of women were beaten during pregnancy. The beating involved kicking or punching in the abdomen,” Dr. Longmore informed.

The Senator lamented that persons are now too aggressive in how they communicate, which leads to unnecessary conflicts.

“Too many intimate, interpersonal, family and community relationships suffer with grave consequences on the basis of sometimes very simple misunderstandings. We need to be more tender and caring to each other in how were communicate, in how we look out for each other,” she said.

She suggested that instead of getting into heated altercations, persons should just  step away from the confrontation.