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Opposition Senator, Sandrea Falconer is calling for a moral revolution among citizens at all levels of the society, that will enable the country to effectively deal with challenges.
Making her presentation in the 2008/09 State of the Nation Debate in the Senate on July 18, she said that, as a country, Jamaica had “lost its moral bearings,” with traditional norms and standards giving way to “relative values and pragmatic conveniences.”
“The soul of the nation has lost its Godly axis and is largely dominated by ethical ambiguities and ambivalence in applying the meaning of the terms ‘right’ and ‘wrong’,” she said.
Senator Falconer argued that changes in the country’s social fabric could not be effected without radical commitment to moral values and standards governing conduct and relationships, directing the vision and hopes of the nation, and demanding commitment from persons from all strata of the society”We must become a morally driven society above political ambitions, economic aspirations, social prejudices, and religious traditions. It means that before we can solve the problems we face as a nation, we need to develop and apply an ethical frame of reference in every sphere of national life,” she emphasized, adding that morality is measured by what is said and done when not under public scrutiny.
Senator Falconer noted that against the background of the “material and spiritual poverty” and violence which citizens are grappling with, politicians are faced with the challenge of providing leadership with vision, integrity, decisiveness and compassion.
“Our job is to serve the interests of all the people to the best of our ability. We, as public servants, must set an example for the rest of the nation. More is required from those of us who have been thrust in this important position,” she stressed.
Miss Falconer said in spite of the turbulence and the frustration of the social and economic challenges, “I hear voices of optimism and determination.”
“I see evidence of a new spirit among the people coming sometimes from the very quarters we have condemned and from among persons we so readily dismiss. I believe there is a river of hope running through many spheres of national life and through our culture,” she added.