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  • Addressing 324 new constables at their Passing Out Parade and Awards Ceremony, held at the National Police College of Jamaica, at Twickenham Park, in St. Catherine, on April 29, National Security Minister, Hon. Robert Montague, said the Government and citizens anticipated “each of you making your special contribution to the building of a safer and more peaceful Jamaica.”
  • Meanwhile, President of the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives (NOBLE), in the United States, Gregory Thomas, urged the graduates to bear in mind at all times that they are providing a “critical service to the citizens of Jamaica.”
  • “The challenge for you is to be prepared to provide professional policing and guardian services to the many (law abiding citizens), while properly separating out those who might engage in criminal behaviour,”

The latest batch of police recruits have been encouraged to strive for professional excellence in the execution of their duties.

Addressing 324 new constables at their Passing Out Parade and Awards Ceremony, held at the National Police College of Jamaica, at Twickenham Park, in St. Catherine, on April 29, National Security Minister, Hon. Robert Montague, said the Government and citizens anticipated “each of you making your special contribution to the building of a safer and more peaceful Jamaica.”

“An effective Police Force is essential to Jamaica’s social and economic growth, and we are grateful to the thousands of policemen and women who have sworn to protect, serve and reassure the people of Jamaica, often in challenging circumstances and at great personal cost,” he added.

The Minister said the society is mindful that there are “a few persons” in the JCF deemed corrupt, whose conduct undermine the work of the majority.

He warned that they would not be allowed to get away with such practices, and “will be found out and face the full consequences of their actions within the law.”

“The citizens of Jamaica must continue to have confidence and trust in the Police if they are to work as partners with the security forces in our shared mission of fighting crime. It is now up to you to apply yourselves with diligence and professionalism to serve the citizens of Jamaica,” he told the graduates.

Mr. Montague also re-affirmed the administration’s support for the JCF, noting that “billions of dollars” have been spent to equip and upgrade their crime fighting capacity, by incorporating the latest available technology and techniques in intelligence gathering and analysis, forensics, communications and general law enforcement.

“You and the people of Jamaica can be assured that we are committed to mobilizing all the resources at our disposal…as we wage a relentless war against criminal elements,” he added.

For his part, United States Ambassador to Jamaica, His Excellency Luis G. Moreno, encouraged the graduates to “do your best” by “working with your communities and international allies.”

Meanwhile, President of the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives (NOBLE), in the United States, Gregory Thomas, urged the graduates to bear in mind at all times that they are providing a “critical service to the citizens of Jamaica.”

He noted that the experience gained and challenges encountered, “dictate that you should be prepared to do your job as guardians and not as warriors.”

“The challenge for you is to be prepared to provide professional policing and guardian services to the many (law abiding citizens), while properly separating out those who might engage in criminal behaviour,” Mr. Thomas emphasized.

All the graduates received basic training certificates, with special awards going to Woman Constable Junlie East, who attained the highest overall course average of 82.36 per cent. She was also adjudged to have displayed the Best Leadership Qualities.

Constable Christopher Bowen was awarded for having displayed the Best Christian Principles.

The Valedictorians were Constable Leon Abrahams and Woman Constable Shenique Woolery.