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Story Highlights

  • The European Union (EU) has handed over science equipment valued at $800,000 to eight schools across the island, as part of a $100 million Improving Innovation Capacities in the Caribbean (INVOCAB) project.
  • Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Science, Technology, Energy and Mining, Hilary Alexander said the investment is very valuable and the students should ensure that it works for years to come.
  • Head of the EU Delegation in Jamaica, Ambassador Paola Amadei, encouraged the students to excel in Science, noting that it is important in all areas of profession.

The European Union (EU) has handed over science equipment valued at $800,000 to eight schools across the island, as part of a $100 million Improving Innovation Capacities in the Caribbean (INVOCAB) project.

Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Science, Technology, Energy and Mining, Hilary Alexander, who addressed the handing over ceremony on February 24, at the Four Seasons Hotel, in St. Andrew, said the investment is very valuable and the students should ensure that it works for years to come.

“This is an investment in your future, and an investment in your country’s future,” she said, noting that energy and food security projects can come from the student population in Jamaica.

The Scientific Research Council (SRC) managed project aims to increase appreciation of Science, Technology and Innovation among the nation’s youth by outfitting science laboratories, establishing Science Centres, engaging teachers in professional development workshops, and hosting science summer camps for teachers.

Head of the EU Delegation in Jamaica, Ambassador Paola Amadei, encouraged the students to excel in Science, noting that it is important in all areas of profession. “It touches on all aspects of human behaviour and activities, and social development. We need more people researching and seeking for innovative solutions,” the Ambassador said.

Deputy Chief Education Officer at the Ministry of Education, Nina Buckle Scott, said the Science project and the machines will empower students to compete in the global workforce, and will also “improve the competencies of our teachers in the delivery of science, to build the critical skills that our students need.”

Principal at the Bull Bay All Age School, Justin Duncan, said children enjoy the subject best when they have the practical tools, and the equipment will be of great benefit to his over 150 students.

Beneficiary schools are the Seaward Primary and Junior High, in St. Andrew; Hartlands Primary, St. Catherine; Bull Bay All Age, St. Andrew; Windsor Castle All Age, Portland; Yallahs High, St. Thomas; Islington and Carron Hall High, St. Mary, and Greater Portmore High, St. Catherine.

The Science in education project is seeking to improve levels of innovation in the Caribbean, by building and strengthening capacities in the areas of science, technology and innovation, as well as using science education as an enabler for poverty reduction, growth and socio-economic development.