JIS News

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  • Minister of Health, Hon. Dr. Fenton Ferguson, says public health officials are busy sanitising schools affected by the Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease, and where necessary they will decide on the closure of the institutions.
  • In an interview with JIS News, Dr. Ferguson informed that as of September 30, some 58 schools and 123 students were confirmed to have been affected by the disease, and public health teams were dispatched to the areas to prevent the spread of the virus.
  • The Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease is a viral illness common in infants and children.

Minister of Health, Hon. Dr. Fenton Ferguson, says public health officials are busy sanitising schools affected by the Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease, and where necessary they will decide on the closure of the institutions.

In an interview with JIS News, Dr. Ferguson informed that as of September 30, some 58 schools and 123 students were confirmed to have been affected by the disease, and public health teams were dispatched to the areas to prevent the spread of the virus.

“We have to look out for children who become dehydrated, to ensure that attention is given,” the Minister said, noting that parents should also look out for the symptom of fever, as it is part of the virus infection.

He said school authorities should immediately send home children, once they suspect them of having the disease, so that they can get medical attention, and where confirmation is made, a child should stay home for at least one week.

The Minister pointed out that the disease normally affects children during the months of June to December, and expressed confidence in the ability of the public health officials to contain the outbreak of the disease.

Health Departments in the respective parishes have been working closely with the schools to minimise the spread of the disease. The schools have also been given guidelines for the management of the virus.

 

The Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease is a viral illness common in infants and children. Fever and blister-like eruptions on the tongue, inside the cheek and on the skin are symptoms of the disease. Poor appetite and a sore throat are other symptoms.

It can be spread through direct contact with mucus in the throat and nose, saliva, fluid from blisters and the stool of infected persons. There is no vaccine to protect against the disease.

Persons can lower their risk of being infected by: washing hands often with soap and water, especially after changing diapers and using the toilet; cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched surfaces.