JIS News

Story Highlights

  • Little World Schoolhouse, a nonprofit educational organisation in Minnesota, United States (US), recently donated six laptop computers valued at $700,000, to six schools in St. Ann and Clarendon, that are a part of the River of Life Programme.
  • The presentation was made at the Village Hotel in Ocho Rios recently.
  • The schools, which benefited from the donation, were York Castle High, St. Hilda's High, and Moneague Primary and Junior High in St. Ann, and Alston High in Clarendon.

Little World Schoolhouse, a nonprofit educational organisation in Minnesota, United States (US), recently donated six laptop computers valued at $700,000, to six schools in St. Ann and Clarendon, that are a part of the River of Life Programme.

The presentation was made at the Village Hotel in Ocho Rios recently. The schools, which benefited from the donation, were York Castle High, St. Hilda’s High, and Moneague Primary and Junior High in St. Ann, and Alston High in Clarendon.

The Rivers of Life Programme is a project of the Little World Schoolhouse under its Jamaica Technology Exchange initiative, and is designed to help “teachers and students connect with each other and their world through science and technology”.

Speaking at the presentation exercise, Neil Henry, Education Officer in the Ministry of Education, Youth and Culture, endorsed the programme, which he said would help promote “long and lasting values and attitudes that will be shared through partnership for sustainable development”.

Pointing to the importance of partnerships for education, Lenworth Fulton, Jamaica 4-H Clubs Executive Director said, “as the world gets smaller and smaller, we need to form greater links for the building of character in students”.

In his remarks, George Leiter, Executive Director of the US-based school, said education was ineffective without technology support. He noted that there were technological tools to enhance communication and for the formation of greater links through the promotion of various programmes.

Expressing gratitude for the computers, Desmond Campbell, teacher at York Castle, said they would be utilised to improve and maintain greater educational links among students and adults in the wider world.

Others participating in the presentation function included Vickie Aas, Mary Dobish, Tina Barsky, George Hower, and Greg Gentle, members of the Minnesota team.

The Jamaica Technology Exchange project started in 1997, when Little World Schoolhouse donated 20 computers with Internet connection to the York Castle High School in Brown’s Town, linking it to its sister school in St. Paul Minnesota.

The programme provides support through teacher training, innovative curriculum development, and ongoing technical support, where teachers and students build online magazines. Schools also cooperate on classroom projects, sharing everything from poetry to data from a science experiment and they write to each other and form lifelong friendships.