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Story Highlights

  • Members of the Rose Town community, in South St. Andrew, as well as other stakeholders are upbeat about the Integrated Community Development Project (ICDP), funded by the World Bank, through the Jamaica Social Investment Fund (JSIF).
  • The project has as its main objectives the elimination of mosquito breeding sites; improvement to public safety; greater access to basic infrastructure, such as roads, storm water drains, sewerage system, water supply and household sanitation; and zinc fence replacement.
  • The ICDP, which commenced in May 2014, will last until May 2020, benefiting some 80,000 residents within communities in the parishes of Kingston, St. Andrew, St. Catherine, Clarendon, St. Ann, St. James and Westmoreland.

Members of the Rose Town community, in South St. Andrew, as well as other stakeholders are upbeat about the Integrated Community Development Project (ICDP), funded by the World Bank, through the Jamaica Social Investment Fund (JSIF).

The project has as its main objectives the elimination of mosquito breeding sites; improvement to public safety; greater access to basic infrastructure, such as roads, storm water drains, sewerage system, water supply and household sanitation; and zinc fence replacement.

Provisions have been made for after-school educational and recreational projects, rehabilitation of schools, delivery of birth certificates, mentorship, employment and skill training for youth, through partnerships with agencies such as HEART Trust/NTA, and the National Solid Waste Management Authority (NSWMA).

Training will be also done for environmental wardens as well as other community volunteers, empowering them to coordinate and monitor waste recycling, composting, waste collection and disposal, and the building of environmental clubs.

“This project is different…we are going to be offering a comprehensive review of the issues that exist here,” said Managing Director of JSIF, Omar Sweeney, at the recent launch of the project.

The Rose Town project is part of a US$42 million integrated development programme being implemented in 18 communities across the island, with support from the Ministry of National Security, and the Social Development Commission (SDC).

“This type of programme is going to be done in partnership…it is not JSIF alone, it is a community based organization…Government Ministries and agencies will be doing it,” Mr. Sweeney added.

As leaders in the community urge its members to buy into the implementation of the plan, Manager for the Rose Town Foundation for the Built Environment, Angela Stultz, said long-term changes will be accomplished for the area.

The initiative, she argued, is the “beginning of an investment in a community, to change people’s lives in a very meaningful and long-term manner; and to transform the community,” she said.

Citing the issues to be tackled, and the way forward, Inspector Rohan Ritchie, who is attached to the Trench Town Police Station, said the area has experienced a significant drop in major crimes, and this must be maintained, as development will only flourish when safety abounds.

“That particular achievement is a direct result of the partnership between the citizens and the police,” he said at the launch.

“It (partnership) has brought a greater level of communication between both groups, and a greater level of appreciation and trust,” Inspector Ritchie said.

With all the plans and funding in place for the integrated development of the community, Manager for the Trench Town Peace and Justice Centre, Sonia Whyte, urged the community members not to let the moment pass them without fully owning the development.

“I am imploring all citizens, it is time to step up. I want Rose Town to take up this opportunity and deal with the issues,” she told the gathering at the launch.

“Represent Rose Town to the best of your ability…exert yourself so that you too can be counted,” Ms. Whyte urged.

Meanwhile, youth leader in the area, Kadean Smith, said she was thankful for the programme to transform her community, as without that, the current stigma will always be negative for young people who want to elevate themselves.

She also called for cooperation from the residents, “not only with JSIF, but with the Jamaica Constabulary Force, and with each other, to ensure that benefits are reaped.”

For his part, Mr. Sweeney told the residents that as they partner together for development, he is expecting full involvement by the community.

The ICDP, which commenced in May 2014, will last until May 2020, benefiting some 80,000 residents within communities in the parishes of Kingston, St. Andrew, St. Catherine, Clarendon, St. Ann, St. James and Westmoreland.