Advertisement
  • JIS News

    Story Highlights

    • Minister of Education, Hon. Rev. Ronald Thwaites, is encouraging investment in the game design industry, which is valued at US$10 billion per annum.
    • He noted that students, particularly boys, are increasingly mastering mathematical concepts, and many of them want to pursue careers in the design of computer-based games.
    • Minister Thwaites was addressing the opening ceremony for CARIMAC's first national conference on digital game design and development.

    Minister of Education, Hon. Rev. Ronald Thwaites, is encouraging investment in the game design industry, which is valued at US$10 billion per annum.

    He noted that students, particularly boys, are increasingly mastering mathematical concepts, and many of them want to pursue careers in the design of computer-based games.

    “There is fertile ground in Jamaica for the establishment of game design and development…there is money to be made and there is good service to education to be rendered,” he said.

    Minister Thwaites was addressing the opening ceremony for the Caribbean Institute of Media and Communication’s (CARIMAC) first national conference on digital game design and development, held on October 14, at the University of the West Indies, Mona campus. St. Andrew.

    Director of CARIMAC, Professor Hopeton Dunn, also underscored the potential for digital game creation in Jamaica.

    He explained that the conference marks the inauguration of game design and development at CARIMAC, and would see the students, guided by overseas experts, designing a digital game over the two days of the forum.

    Noting that Jamaicans have primarily been users and consumers of games developed elsewhere, Professor Dunn questioned “why can’t we introduce the kinds of games that are being used to make fortunes in other countries?”

    He said “the time has come for Jamaicans to learn and earn from the game development industry. We can do a lot with game design – we can use it to integrate with our digital creative skills, help to dramatize our remarkable capacity in sport; propagate our creativity in story-telling; showcase our competence in code and software development. Our youth are no less talented than those abroad”.

    Professor Dunn noted that the conference is one manifestation of CARIMAC’s continued search for new ways to facilitate and foster sustainable development and job creation, and to promote enterprise among students and in the wider community.

    He pointed out that CARIMAC has led the way over the past several years in developing a degree programme in digital media production.

    The conference, being held under the theme: ‘Changing Game: Designing for Development’, marks CARIMAC’s 40th anniversary, and is the first of its kind in the English-speaking Caribbean.

    Skip to content