JIS News

Story Highlights

  • Some 50 Justices of the Peace (JPs) are benefiting from training on the principles of restorative justice.
  • Restorative Justice is essentially a system of justice that focuses on the rehabilitation of offenders through reconciliation with victims and the community at large.
  • JP from St. Catherine, Regina Johnson Williams, also welcomed the training.

Some 50 Justices of the Peace (JPs) are benefiting from training on the principles of restorative justice.

The two-day training got under way this morning (September 5) at the Ministry of Justice, Constant Spring Road, St. Andrew.

The objective is to prepare JPs to play a critical role in the implementation of restorative justice procedures within the formal justice system once the Restorative Justice Bill is passed.

Restorative Justice is essentially a system of justice that focuses on the rehabilitation of offenders through reconciliation with victims and the community at large.

Debate on the Bill began in the House of Representatives on July 19.

Speaking in an interview with JIS News, JP from Clarendon, Winston Anekie, said the training will enable him to carry out his duties more effectively.

“I usually send the offender and the victim for reconciliation… . I always recommend them for mediation if they so desire. I realise that restorative justice is the means to an end, and with that we can certainly take a lot of cases out of the court system and we will have a win-win situation,” he said.

JP from St. Catherine, Regina Johnson Williams, also welcomed the training.

“I love to send the perpetrator and the victim to mediation.  I rather it go there and (they) work out their problems. What we are trying to do is to eliminate violence,” she noted.

Restorative justice programmes are being piloted in Trench Town, August Town and Tower Hill in Kingston and St. Andrew and seven other communities covering the parishes of St. Catherine, Clarendon, Westmoreland and St. James.