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JIS News

The Ministry of Water and Housing is spending approximately $45 million on the Huddersfield/Mango Valley Water Supply Scheme to provide potable water to residents in western St. Mary.
“Water will be sourced from the mains running between Ocho Rios and Port Maria. Water will be pumped to serve the entire area of Mango Valley and Huddersfield,” explained Peter Clarke, Project Engineer for the Huddersfield/Mango Valley Water Supply Scheme.
The project, which was started in 2003, is being undertaken by Carib Engineering Corporation Limited (CECL) in three phases. “The first phase is to put in pipelines of varying sizes, both mains and distribution pipes. The second phase is to put in a holding tank, a storage reservoir with a capacity of 1.1 million litres (approximately 250,000 gallons). This phase also incorporates the installation of a pumping station,” Mr. Clarke told JIS News.
The contract for the pipe-laying component is valued at approximately $23.6 million, and was awarded to Beaverdam Construction in February 2003. This phase is 80 percent complete.
“We have completed a substantial amount of work, almost all the pipelines have gone in. We still have some minor distribution pipes to some households to put in, but all the mains have gone in. To date, the value on the ground is $21.6 million,” Mr. Clarke disclosed, adding that weather permitting, this phase should be completed within the next three to four weeks.
“The outstanding works are to tie in to the mains – the Ocho Rios to Port Maria mains, and to reinstate the pipeline excavation that was done to lay pipes, that is asphalting the pipe trenches,” Mr. Clarke explained. “The tying in [to the mains] is something that has to be done in close collaboration with the NWC [National Water Commission] as it must be done at a time when it is not only convenient to them, but also convenient to their customers.”
The contract for the second phase of the project, the installation of the storage reservoir is valued at $16.6 million and was awarded to Florida Aquastore Limited of the United States.
“They [Florida Aquastore Limited] will be supplying (manufacturing) and installing the storage reservoir. At this stage, they have indicated that the manufacturing process is complete and we are now in the process of having it (reservoir) shipped to Jamaica,” the CECL Project Engineer told JIS News.
This contract also includes the installation of outdoor pumps and outdoor switchgear to pump the water through the pipelines.
According to Mr. Clarke, when the first two phases of the project are completed, the approximately 12,000 persons residing in the Huddersfield and Mango Valley areas would have water piped to their homes. He noted that while the phases 1 and 2 were slated for completion in March 2006, “we are working assiduously to complete the project before then.”
Meanwhile, Carib Engineering wants to broaden the scope of the project to provide potable water to even more homes and residents in the area. This will be achieved through a third phase at cost of approximately $7 million. “Phase 3 is an extension of the service area into Fellowship Hall…this involves the installation of another pump station and a smaller reservoir in the Fellowship Hall area,” Mr. Clarke explained.
Meanwhile, the CECL is proceeding apace with the reinstatement of roads in the project area, which were dug up to lay pipes for the water supply scheme.