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  • The Ministry of Health is advising the public that all health facilities, type three and above, have been designated vaccination sites for parents to get their children fully immunised.
  • This, as the Ministry embarks on a 12-week measles prevention campaign for children between ages 1 and 6 years.
  • The Ministry of Health is also reminding parents that vaccines are free at all public health facilities and adequate supply of vaccines and tools to administer them are available across the island.

The Ministry of Health is advising the public that all health facilities, type three and above, have been designated vaccination sites for parents to get their children fully immunised.

This, as the Ministry embarks on a 12-week measles prevention campaign for children between ages 1 and 6 years.

Speaking at a JIS Think Tank on Tuesday (February 24), Director of Family Health Services in the Ministry of Health, Dr. Simone Spencer, said parents can take their children to the facilities for vaccinations from Monday to Friday during normal working hours.

She advised that parents of children born before 2010 must take with them the child’s immunisation card, or the health development passport for those children born after 2010.

“Once they take those, the public health team, which is usually the public health nurse or the midwife within the clinic, would check to see what vaccines the child is eligible for and administer same,” she noted.

Dr. Spencer said that usually the health facilities have specific days for child health clinics and when vaccinations are given, but the move was taken to allow full access for the 12-week period, in order to ensure that everyone in the target group is reached.

“So, what we have done is basically open up access and availability to the population during the campaign period of 12 weeks to ensure that whenever clients come they are able to access the vaccines,” she said.

Meanwhile, Dr. Spencer is imploring school principals and parents to cooperate with public health officials by sending their child’s immunisation card or child health development passports to school on the day that the public health team visits to conduct immunisation sessions.

“This is so that they can do their checks, and for those children who would be missing any relevant vaccines, then these are administered at school,” she noted.

In the meantime, Dr. Spencer said the Ministry has engaged other stakeholders such as private practitioners, pediatricians and family physicians to ensure that they also vaccinate children between ages 1 to 6 years.

“As we know, not everybody accesses vaccines within the public sector, so they may go privately as well,” she noted.

The Ministry of Health is also reminding parents that vaccines are free at all public health facilities and adequate supply of vaccines and tools to administer them are available across the island.