JIS News

Story Highlights

  • Environmental sustainability is one of six key target areas contained in the PSOJ’s 2020-2022 Strategy document, which was unveiled during a media briefing at the entity’s head office in Kingston on Thursday (January 9).
  • Mrs. McIntosh Robinson said that the PSOJ will continue to engage public- and private-sector stakeholders on proper waste management, and financial institutions to provide renewable energy financing solutions for individuals and businesses.
  • Other areas that the PSOJ has prioritised for strategic focus over the next two years are human capital development, ease of doing business, increasing direct investments, corruption, and crime.

The Private Sector Organisation of Jamaica (PSOJ) is looking to facilitate the planting of at least 500,000 trees over the next two years.

The move is in support of the Government’s initiative, launched last October, for the planting of three million trees over three years as part of measures to mitigate the effects of climate change.

It is also in keeping with the PSOJ’s focus on environmental sustainability being spearheaded by the organisation’s Energy, Environment and Climate Change Committee.

Environmental sustainability is one of six key target areas contained in the PSOJ’s 2020-2022 Strategy document, which was unveiled during a media briefing at the entity’s head office in Kingston on Thursday (January 9).

PSOJ Vice President, Mariame McIntosh Robinson, said that the organisation is “very supportive [of] and enthusiastic” about the Government’s tree-planting project, noting that it is expected to have a “tremendously positive impact” on the environment.

“Environmental sustainability… essentially climate change, is one of the biggest risks facing our region today. That risk is only going to grow [if not decisively addressed]. It’s very clear that when you look across the globe, we are but a very small region… but at great risk,” she noted.

 “The sustainability of our beaches, gullies and drains continues to be a challenge and it’s something that we, at the PSOJ, want to be able to support as we look to address these challenges,” she added.

Mrs. McIntosh Robinson said that the PSOJ will continue to engage public- and private-sector stakeholders on proper waste management, and financial institutions to provide renewable energy financing solutions for individuals and businesses.

 “It’s clear that we have an over-reliance on fossil fuels for our energy needs. Therefore, we, as a country, have taken the decision, led by the Government, to set targets for renewable energy power generation… increasing the mix of renewable energy to 30 per cent by 2030,” she noted.

Other areas that the PSOJ has prioritised for strategic focus over the next two years are human capital development, ease of doing business, increasing direct investments, corruption, and crime.