Advertisement
JIS News

Story Highlights

  • Minister of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade, Senator the Hon. A.J. Nicholson, says the principles of unity and cooperation exemplified by the Venezuelan military leader and liberator, Simon Bolivar, are still relevant today.
  • Simon Bolivar played a key role in Latin America’s independence movement against British rule. He was born on July 24, 1783 in Caracas, Venezuela and died at age 47 after a short illness in Santa Marta, Colombia, on December 17, 1830.
  • The Minister was speaking at a ceremony, held on July 24 at Simon Bolivar’s statue, National Heroes Circle, to commemorate the 232nd anniversary of his birth.

Minister of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade, Senator the Hon. A.J. Nicholson, says the principles of unity and cooperation exemplified by the Venezuelan military leader and liberator, Simon Bolivar, are still relevant today.

Simon Bolivar played a key role in Latin America’s independence movement against British rule. He was born on July 24, 1783 in Caracas, Venezuela and died at age 47 after a short illness in Santa Marta, Colombia, on December 17, 1830.

“It is therefore quite appropriate for us, some 232 years since the birth of this great liberator and 200 years since he walked the shores of Jamaica, to hone in on those principles he so fervently embodied and exemplified throughout his lifetime,” he said.

The Minister was speaking at a ceremony, held on July 24 at Simon Bolivar’s statue, National Heroes Circle, to commemorate the 232nd anniversary of his birth.

Mr. Nicholson along with  Ambassador of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, Her Excellency Maria Jacqueline Mendoza and the President of the Bolivarian Society of Jamaica, Anne Lopez,  placed flowers  at his statue.

The Minister said that Simon Bolivar should be recognised for his “pursuit of solidarity among all people, cooperation across all boundaries and perseverance and determination towards regional unity and development.”

He also read excerpts from the ‘Carta de Jamaica’ (the Jamaican Letter) written by Simon Bolivar and published in the Royal Gazette, a Jamaican newspaper, on September 6, 1815.

“That vision that Simon Bolivar had for the future of our region is today being revealed in the day-to-day lives of our peoples and our region as a whole. His efforts not only influenced the historical trajectory of the Bolivarian countries, Venezuela, Colombia, Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador and Panama, but also forged among us a common purpose and a common identity,” he said.

Meanwhile, the Venezuelan Ambassador  said that historical ties with Venezuela and Jamaica began on the day that Liberator, Simon Bolivar, arrived in Kingston on May 14, 1815.

Simon Bolivar was exiled in Jamaica from May 14 to December 18, 1815.

The Ambassador said that this year marks the 50th anniversary of diplomatic relations between Venezuela and Jamaica, noting that bilateral relations between the countries have strengthened over the years.

Skip to content