JIS News

Story Highlights

  • The pilot phase of the initiative involving the Ministry of Education, and private sector entity, Money Basics for Kids, to deliver financial literacy to primary and high school students, kicked off on March 4 with a teacher training symposium, at the Medallion Hall Hotel, in St. Andrew.
  • Education Minister, Hon. Rev. Ronald Thwaites, who spoke at the symposium’s opening, endorsed the programme, noting that it is intended to equip the participants with the knowledge and techniques to integrate financial literacy into the schools’ curricula.
  • Twenty teachers from the eight schools initially involved in the programme, titled: ‘Taking Charge of the Financial Future of Youth in Jamaica’, participated in the symposium, which was administered by representatives of Money Basics for Kids.

The pilot phase of the initiative involving the Ministry of Education, and private sector entity, Money Basics for Kids, to deliver financial literacy to primary and high school students, kicked off on March 4 with a teacher training symposium, at the Medallion Hall Hotel, in St. Andrew.

Twenty teachers from the eight schools initially involved in the programme, titled: ‘Taking Charge of the Financial Future of Youth in Jamaica’, participated in the symposium, which was administered by representatives of Money Basics for Kids.

The participating institutions included: Calabar High School, Ardenne High School, Holy Trinity High School, St. Francis Primary School, Jessie Rippoll Primary School, and Allman Town Primary School from Kingston and St. Andrew; Greater Portmore Primary School, St. Catherine; and Lyssons Primary School, St. Thomas.

The programme, which was launched in January, and is being sponsored by First Global Bank, seeks to offer students enrolled in Grades Four to Seven, a simple guide into the world of money management and entrepreneurship, through classroom instructions delivered by their teachers.

It aims to make children financially literate by educating them about the basic concepts of money, its origin, as well as how to earn, spend, save, and manage it.

Wednesday’s symposium formed part of six months of engagements, geared toward analysing and determining how best the initiative can be expanded to other schools islandwide.

Education Minister, Hon. Rev. Ronald Thwaites, who spoke at the symposium’s opening, endorsed the programme, noting that it is intended to equip the participants with the knowledge and techniques to integrate financial literacy into the schools’ curricula.

“The project is intended to engage the interest of learners in the practical application of money (and complement) the advancement of numeracy and literacy skills. We are pleased to partner with Money Basics for Kids in implementing this project…(and) hope that the infusion of financial information into the school curriculum will redound to the personal benefit of students and teachers alike,” Rev. Thwaites said, while commending First Global Bank’s input.

In his remarks, Jamaica Teachers’ Association (JTA) President, Doran Dixon, underscored the programme’s importance in instilling an appreciation of the need for proper money management to be exercised by both students and teachers, particularly in relation to preparing for retirement.

“Wealth creation is one thing, but how you sustain that wealth, how you make sure that you are able to live and sustain yourself (in retirement), is also critical. So, we congratulate and commend the Ministry and Money Basics for Kids for the programme. We are ready to be full partners,” he said.

Meanwhile, Money Basics National Financial Literacy Coordinator, Sharryn Dawson, told JIS News that October’s culmination of the pilot phase will include, among other things, a competition involving all participating schools.