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JIS News

Story Highlights

  • The Foreign Affairs Minister of Venezuela, Delcy Rodriguez, has accepted a copy of a magazine titled ‘The Jamaican History’ or ‘La historia de Jamaica’, on behalf of Venezuelan President Nicholas Maduro.
  • Miss Lopez said she was encouraged “to do something” this year after the commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the ‘Carta de Jamaica’ of Simon Bolivar on Sunday, September 6, last year, the date on which Simón Bolivar wrote the letter.
  • Miss Lopez is encouraging Jamaicans to get involved in the activities of the Society, formed in 1952.

The Foreign Affairs Minister of Venezuela, Delcy Rodriguez, has accepted a copy of a magazine titled ‘The Jamaican History’  or  ‘La historia de Jamaica’, on behalf of Venezuelan President Nicholas Maduro.

Minister Rodriguez accepted the magazine while at the Simon Bolivar’s monument in Kingston recently,  during the one-day working visit to the island by President Maduro.

The magazine contains articles on the history of the Venezuelan Revolutionary Leader, Simón Bolivar and the six countries that he liberated – Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Peru and Bolivia.  It also features ‘The Jamaica Letter’ or ‘La Carta de Jamaica’, written by Simon Bolivar, on September 6, 1850, while exiled in Jamaica.

Essays and pictures contributed by the Venezuelan and Colombian embassies are also a part of the 33-page magazine.

President of the Bolvarian Society of Jamaican,  Annie Lopez, who came up with the idea to prepare the magazine, told JIS News that it was intended  to inform people of the history of Jamaica and the cultural ties that exist between Jamaica and Venezuela.

Miss Lopez said she was encouraged “to do something” this year after  the  commemoration of  the 200th anniversary of  the  ‘Carta de Jamaica’ of Simon Bolivar on Sunday, September 6, last year, the date on which Simón Bolivar wrote the letter.

She noted that the first inhabitants of Jamaica were Arawaks who came from the Orinoco Valley in Venezuela and settled in Jamaica centuries before Christopher Columbus came in 1494.

Miss Lopez is planning to present copies of the magazine to schools and libraries and will be meeting with the relevant officials to begin the process. “Everybody says the Magazine is interesting and it should be in schools. It is also interesting reading for tourists,” she informed.

Miss Lopez, who has been President of the Society  since 1997, said one of  its  aims is to foster relations with other foreign countries and to promote the speaking of Spanish in Jamaica.

She urged Jamaicans to learn to speak the Spanish language, citing  the country’s close relationship with Spanish speaking countries.

Miss Lopez is encouraging Jamaicans to get involved in the activities of the Society, formed in 1952. Persons interested in participating in activities of the Society can call: 821-5848 or email: anniewlopez@yahoo.com.