JIS News

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  • The local pig/pork industry continues to have great potential for growth and ongoing development, despite the many challenges facing the sector.
  • This was stated by outgoing President of the Jamaica Pig Farmers Association, Delroy Manya, when he presented the Director’s report at the association’s 12th annual general meeting
  • As a result of an outbreak of the viral infection, Porcine Epidemic Diarrhoea Virus (PEDv), in the United States and Canada, local farmers are expected to get a demand boost, and as such, are encouraged to “ramp up production.”

The local pig/pork industry continues to have great potential for growth and ongoing development, despite the many challenges facing the sector.

This was stated by outgoing President of the Jamaica Pig Farmers Association, Delroy Manya, when he presented the Director’s report at the association’s 12th annual general meeting, at the Golf View hotel in Mandeville, on September 25.

He informed that among the positive developments for the sector during the 2013/14 period was a four per cent increase in the price of pork, to offset some of the increases in operational expenses.

Also, as a result of an outbreak of the viral infection, Porcine Epidemic Diarrhoea Virus (PEDv), in the United States and Canada, local farmers are expected to get a demand boost, and as such, are encouraged to “ramp up production.”

However, Mr. Manya reported that in spite of the positives, there were many challenges for the year. Chief among them were delays in collection, extended credit periods and lower movement of animals to slaughter.

He noted that compounding the farmers’ plight were higher prices for water, electricity, feed, medication, labour, and the cost of transportation. “These were factors that led to farmers scaling down or exiting the industry,” he said.

The outgoing President further informed that although the sector reported mega investments in production, processing, harvesting facility and marketing for the 2012/2013 period, pig farmers remain challenged as these investments are yet to have a positive impact on primary producers in the form of better contractual arrangements and improvement in the movement of pigs to slaughter.