JIS News

Story Highlights

  • The Planning Institute of Jamaica (PIOJ) is reporting that it has been reaping success from implementation of the Strategic Programme for Climate Resilience (SPCR) and has identified major outputs.
  • The SPCR, which was approved in 2011, is geared towards mainstreaming climate change into development planning; providing information on novel approaches, including climate financing to overcome the challenges of climate change, and disseminating lessons learned from adaptation interventions.
  • Implemented by the PIOJ with financing from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and World Bank, the programme was designed to assist in climate-proofing Jamaica’s development with a focus on priority sectors: Tourism, Agriculture and Food Security, Health, Water, and Human Settlement and Coastal Resources.

The Planning Institute of Jamaica (PIOJ) is reporting that it has been reaping success from implementation of the Strategic Programme for Climate Resilience (SPCR) and has identified major outputs.

The SPCR, which was approved in 2011, is geared towards mainstreaming climate change into development planning; providing information on novel approaches, including climate financing to overcome the challenges of climate change, and disseminating lessons learned from adaptation interventions.

Implemented by the PIOJ with financing from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and World Bank, the programme was designed to assist in climate-proofing Jamaica’s development with a focus on priority sectors: Tourism, Agriculture and Food Security, Health, Water, and Human Settlement and Coastal Resources.

Giving an update at an SPCR Stakeholder Consultation workshop at the Terra Nova All-Suite Hotel on January 22, Director, Sustainable Development & Regional Planning at PIOJ, Nadine Brown, noted that the outputs were achieved from the implementation of four investment projects valued at US$37.45 million.

The projects are Improving Climate Data and Information Management; the Adaptation Programme and Financing Mechanism; Promoting Community-based Resilience in the Fisheries Sector; and Financing Water Adaptation in Jamaica’s New Urban Housing Sector.

“We are improving quality climate change information for effective planning and action at local and national levels and have, so far, installed over 35 automatic weather stations, one sea level tide gauge at the Montego Bay Pier, 31 intensity ring gauges, one real-time data hydromet system, a situation room and 12 soil moisture probes,” Ms. Brown outlined.

Through the implementation of the various projects, she noted that there has been improved access by small and medium scale operators in the agribusiness and related sectors to financing adaptation initiatives.

As such, she informed that 83 grants were disbursed to community-based organisations and civil society groups under the special climate change adaptation fund and 62 loans disbursed to entities in the agricultural and tourism sectors under the climate change adaptation line of credit.

Other initiatives undertaken included a knowledge management component of the programme; increasing awareness of climate change as well as improving attitude and behaviour towards climate change; the launch of the SPCR communication campaign, dubbed ‘Smart and Steady yet Climate Ready’, with a number of key messages and material highlighting the programme and its components.

“We have trained members of mainstream media as well as communication persons within corporate and government entities in communicating climate change and disasters, and participated in and hosted various workshops, exhibitions and other events islandwide,” Ms. Brown noted.

“We have also sought to create awareness about building climate resilience in the housing sector as it relates to water efficiency, and this has resulted in the creation of a homeowners’ guide, which contains information to help householders manage their water usage as well as increase their overall knowledge on climate change,” the Director shared.

Remaining deliverables to be executed under the programme include the preparation of sector strategies and action plans, advancement of initiatives under the water and fisheries projects, implementation of adaptation initiatives under the adaptation programme and financing mechanism, and vulnerability assessment of the health sector.

The three-day workshop (January 22 to 24) sought to review the SPCR and its relevance, examining the extent to which the programme is contributing to the national response to climate change, identifying gaps and synergies, and developing ownership and empowerment to bring the projects to a successful completion.

The SPCR will end in 2023.