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Story Highlights

  • The Commission of Strata Corporations (CSC) is encouraging persons to utilise the dispute resolution service it offers.
  • The dispute resolution process forms part of the responsibility of the CSC under the Registration Strata Titles Act.
  • This process allows the CSC to oversee disputes between proprietors or between proprietors and the executive committee of a strata property. An aggrieved party would then submit an application to the Board for a dispute resolution or order.

The Commission of Strata Corporations (CSC) is encouraging persons to utilise the dispute resolution service it offers.

The dispute resolution process forms part of the responsibility of the CSC under the Registration Strata Titles Act.

This process allows the CSC to oversee disputes between proprietors or between proprietors and the executive committee of a strata property. An aggrieved party would then submit an application to the Board for a dispute resolution or order.

“To access our dispute resolution service, persons can complete and submit an application form found on our website and pay the required fee of $4,000. The aggrieved party and the defendant will then be invited to a hearing led by our inspectors, often held at our office,” Chief Executive Officer of the Commission of Strata Corporations, Sandra Garrick, told JIS News.

She noted that hearings are scheduled within 30 days of the CSC receiving the applications and based on the availability of inspectors.

“It’s an easier process, it’s cheaper, and persons receive resolution quicker as opposed to going through the court system,” Mrs. Garrick said.

She argued that if more persons utilised the dispute resolution services of the CSC, it could aid in clearing the backlog faced by the courts.

Since 2009, the CSC has received 69 dispute resolution applications.

Mrs. Garrick said that one of the challenges the CSC faces is the failure of respondents turning up on hearing days.

“In such cases, the Commission is forced to make a hard and fast order based on the law, as opposed to having both parties arrive at a mutually amicable outcome. When persons don’t come to the hearing, they do so at their peril,” she emphasised.

“Our resolution process is a little different from normal dispute resolution, because the Registration Strata Titles Act gives the Commission the power to enforce an order under the law,” she informed.

The orders may include the rental or the sale of the unit through purchasing power.

Mrs. Garrick pointed out that the most common issues brought before the CSC include non-payment of maintenance fees, parked derelict vehicles, the illegal extension of buildings, noise pollution, use of marijuana and antisocial behaviour.

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